• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Bureaucratic Management.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An organisation can be best describes as a unit which consists of individuals who, in order to achieve certain objectives, influence other people. They may be trying to achieve wealth or well being through differing processes, technologies, structures and cultures. In order to run an organisation well management is needed. Management then is the planning, organising, leading and controlling of human resources, s well as other resources, in order to achieve effective goals. Rosemary Stewart describes a manager as; "Someone who gets things done with the aid of people" (Boddy P11) Bureaucratic Management An important aim for most businesses today is to increase productivity and efficiency. In order to do so, many businesses adopt theoretical approached to management. The theory of bureaucracy is one in which is the underlying theme of control in many organisations of today. Bureaucratic management is described as "a formal system of organisation in order to maintain efficiency and effectiveness." (Contemporary Management P48) Max Weber developed the theory of bureaucratic management and derived five main principles which should be adopted when using bureaucratic management. Although his theories were very sound, perhaps the most influential principles of management in organisations are that of Henri Fayol. He devised 14 theories of management however some of these theories are similar to that of Max Weber. Like Weber, Fayol believed in division of labour where workers would be given more job duties and responsibilities. ...read more.

Middle

Similarly he believed that some form of agreement should be made by the organisation and its employees in order to maintain that employees are treated fairly and overall be rewarded for their performance. Espirit De Crops is an important part in the success of a bureaucratic organisation because it refers to a shared feeling of motivation and commitment to a specific cause. When managers are able to encourage personal and verbal relations between both managers and workers espirit de corps can be developed. Furthermore, this can be linked to Human Relations management. Human Relations Management Human relations management is the belief that a concern for human factors such as job specialisation in order to improve productivity. It was based on the belief that people have a social dimension and have important links not just to the workplace, but out with the organisation itself. Human relations was a move from a 'rational economic' view of man, where a employee will increase productivity with economic benefits such as wage rises and bonuses; to a social view of man, where productivity will increase with an increase in employee relation ships and in general better social conditions. Mary Parker Follet believed in the creativity of group processes. On the other hand she did not believe that division of labour was the right way to achieve optimised productivity unlike Fayols' bureaucratic theories. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand, management control in bureaucratic management is very high because authority is clearly marked out, with managers being the imperative and employees must follow their orders. Human Relations Management is successful in some organisation today. Organisations that tend to benefit from Human Relations Management are call centres because employees tend to work in teams and have a closer interaction with their managers. However the influence on performance that Mayo discussed is much more complicated than assumed because by providing good supervision and adequate working conditions can increase satisfaction within the organisation but does not always mean it will increase productivity. Management control in an organisation which is adopts Human Relations management does have management control however it is less centralised. Employees are able to put across ideas and perspectives. Similarly, in some organisations the role of management can be shifted depending on who is best suited to the job. Overall, adopting theories of management in an organisation is very important because it can shape the way you run your business, but more importantly it can increase productivity and effectiveness by all who are involved in the organisation. Bureaucratic management is a system of management which is widely used today and more classical compare to human relations management. It is clear to see that there are differences between bureaucratic management and human relations management, the most obvious being that human relations management takes into consideration the social behaviours of employees whereas bureaucratic management concentrates more on hierarchy and strict division of labour. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE People in Business section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE People in Business essays

  1. Managing Human Resources in Marks & Spencer.

    The resources devoted to Marks & Spencer' training can create substantial costs. It is important that training needs are correctly identified and the desired standard of skill is established. The training programme needs to be administered efficiently and evaluated - the results achieved by the Marks & Spencer employees that

  2. Building Effective Teams.

    It is considered bad form to withhold or ration information that could be useful to team members. Information is seen as empowering the group, not any one member. Feedback is serious business. Team members must provide each other with feedback about whether their performance enhances the team's performance or impedes it.

  1. What are the staff positions in a typical police department? Is there a difference ...

    To try and eliminate the negative effects of this process, supervisory personnel should be assigned to manage it. They should do their best not to produce an unfair influence on decisions made by junior employees. The changes I foresee in management of law enforcement agencies in the 2000's is the incorporation/use of information and communication technology and anti-terrorism tactics.

  2. Banquets Management

    Supervisions of the function room layout and the post clearing of the room. DUTIES 1. Preparing a function sheet from the information collected during discussions with the client and distributing them to the kitchen, H.K, F.O and other concerned departments.

  1. The work of Elton Mayo in the "Hawthorne Studies"

    The last of the experiment was executed by using 2 girls only. Under a widely varying light level, there production levels stayed constant. At that stage of the experiment, the researchers noticed that if the experimenter said that bright was good, then the brighter the workers believed it to be the more they like it.

  2. The background of the Kettering Park Hotel and Spa

    This means that there are no problems with customers, employees and co-workers. The assistant managers jobs are: Food and beverage - This person is in charge of the restaurant and all other food and beverage that are dispensed inside the hotel walls.

  1. Power, Authority, Control, Obedience and Initiative in the context of IT

    Indeed, power, authority, obedience, responsibility and control are important to understanding the role that IT plays in reorienting the relationships that constitute the structure of organisations. Power, the ability to get things done (Kanter, 1979), is important to this discussion because the access to information afforded by the technology can have the affect of shifting power relationships.

  2. Technology's Influence On Organisations.

    when he noted 40 years later that the characteristics of complex organisations fall into two categories: - Structure: The arrangements that related the parts to the whole; and - Process: The flow of information and materials through the structure, and the processes by which that flow is controlled.4 It has

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work