• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Case Analysis: Peter Browning and Continental White Cap

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Midterm Case Analysis: Peter Browning and Continental White Cap. 1. The Case: What are the critical issues facing Peter Browning and Continental White Cap? His goals? The organization's goals? 2. The Analysis: What are White Cap's strengths and weaknesses in light of its goals and the objectives for the proposed change? What type of change strategy is indicated? 3. The Action Plan: What steps do you recommend in implementing the planned change? Be specific with regards to processes for gaining support, implementing new practices and procedures and institutionalizing the change. What contingency plans might be needed to manage change effectively? Dick Hoffman couldn't have been more right when he declared that Peter Browning was 'smack dab between a rock and a hard place.' Under the management umbrella, Peter Browning was faced with several issues. The majority of White Cap's employees were resistant to change. Many of the employees were older and had been with the firm for quite some time. They had become accustomed to a culture not only of little change but one groomed over the years by the White family. Employees came to expect unquestioned job security, liberal benefits, and a management structure built on personal relationships rather than job performance. The strength of these expectations was employee loyalty. Many of the White Cap employees have been with the company for over thirty years, bringing both their friends and family aboard. ...read more.

Middle

Continental's management did not believe that White Cap was aware of the speed at which the competition was beginning to steal White Cap's business, and that White Cap's management was blind to it by an arrogance of being number one for such a long period of time. White Caps's management team was accustomed to a management style consisting of little if any friction between managers and a formal structure of superior dominance. Although changes were necessary at White Cap, Continental itself was making serious reforms. Since the acquisition by Peter Kiewit and sons in 1984 they had sold off $1.6 billion worth of businesses and cut corporate staffing tenfold. Change was happening throughout the company and management would expect nothing less from Peter Browning. Peter Browning's first step in beginning to implement change was to create a vision that White Cap's employees would understand and buy into. A vision that combined the traditions of White Cap while focusing on regaining a competitive edge in the marketplace was needed. It required a vision of both conceptual framework with an emotional element. Such s vision would guide the behavior of both employees and management to see a future state for the White Cap division. Along with the vision, a modern mission statement was required, one that clearly set out specific and measurable end goals while keeping them realistic and attainable within a specific time frame. ...read more.

Conclusion

The goal being that other employees will recognize the recognition these employees are receiving and strive to perform at their level. Although I foresee White Cap's employees initially meeting such programs with bitterness, over time a task alignment will take place. Through the recurring change programs the employees will be part of; their altitudes will begin to follow the actions management has set in motion. By changing the cognitive component of the employee's functions, the affective component will soon change from one of contentment, to one of excitement, with an encouragement to become proactive with change leading to a change in behavior and eventually a change in attitude. Browning and White Cap as a whole must also keep in mind the possibility that they have already fallen too far behind their competition and their customers may enter into contracts with others before White Cap can meet there needs. An option could be the acquisition of a firm already utilizing the plastic technology. If an acquisition is financially unattainable a merger could feasible. White Cap has a strong brand name and a long standing tradition of success. Smaller, lesser known yet more technologically advanced firms would find these qualities attractive. As a contingency Continental must consider its last resort options of merger or even a sell-off of White Cap. This type of transformational change should be considered a last resort for Continental because of the disastrous effect this would have on its employees. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE People in Business section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE People in Business essays

  1. Human resources management merger of two colleges

    Jane is located at Battersea. And Vashti Marshall the Training Administrator provides administrative support to the development team. How the Human Resources Department in Westminster Kingsway College provide its services. Employment law is increasingly complex, both in UK and EC Level, and the department assess and advise on the impact

  2. Analyzing Toys "R" Us Case.

    Customer awareness to the Toys "R" Us advertising campaign jumped 20 points. Initiatives such as these are organized and communicated much more quickly with a knowledge management solution in place. 3. Contrasting the solutions The Toys "R" Us communication solution was first primarily driven by the employees need for a better communication system.

  1. Report: Type of ownership of J-Sainsbury

    Any shareholders that do not agree with the way J-Sainsbury's is managed may raise an objective or vote against the directors. All accounts must be published every year so J-Sainsbury's cannot hide a problem year. Shareholders will expect to receive a dividend. They will want the share value to increase.

  2. 'Pizza Hut' case study.

    To keep up with other leading brands market research is done to see what customers want. The Finance Department deals with anything to do with wages, costs, accounts and capital. 'Pizza Hut' have to balance there money so they have enough to pay for rent, adverts, maintenance, products and wages for example.

  1. siemens case study

    An other problem due to cultural differences is lack of communication comprehension which even led a branch to present a faulty product to one of its big customer. Germans and Indians do not mean the same things while speaking the same language.

  2. Ikea case study

    * The IKEA WAY: - quality products at affordable prices - seeking new ways to lower prices - cheap logistics - considerable profit from small margins - staying close to customers - design reflecting the Swedish Culture * selling lifestyle: being far more than a furniture merchant, IKEA sells a

  1. TNT case study

    because, if HR planning works successfully the following of this success will be: * Staff employees are fully utilised to the benefit of TNT. * Staffs do challenging work that motivates and stimulates them. * Overtime is only done when vitally necessary.

  2. La Tasca Restaurant Case Study

    Societal influences can have an impact on many organisations. E.g. In 2004, for the first time in over 10 years 'McDonalds' fast food restaurants sales had plummeted, as a result McDonald's fast food chain developed and incorporated healthy options into their menus.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work