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Customer Care - the task of always meeting customer's basic demands

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Introduction

Customer Care The task of defining the term customer care is far from simple, as almost everyone will have his or her own definition A starting point for this task is to look at a number of questions to ask ourselves that will aid the defining of care for your organisation; i) Who are our customers? ii) What do they want? iii) Why do customers come to the company? Popular Definitions of Customer Care "Always meeting our customers basic expectations" "The same welcome and service everywhere" "The same good level of care however small the request or difficult the customer" "Consistently meeting or exceeding customer needs and or requirements" "Ensuring that the customer feels valued or understood" Ultimately a good definition of care is to ask your self" If I was a customer of my company how would I expect to be treated and cared for?" * Customer - A person or persons who receive goods or services in exchange for a consideration. * Service - An intangible product that is agreed by both parties, the customer and the supplier, in exchange for a consideration. * Care- An act of looking after or showing concern for an individual or groups of individuals. * Customer Service - Any activity, both directly and indirectly, involving customers and the relationship with customers, that ultimately aims to satisfy the needs and requirements of those customers. "What you do for your customers" * Customer Care - The service that is delivered, that meets the perceived needs of the customer by showing concern and genuine interest in the customers needs and requirements. "How you do, what you do, for customers" Who Are Your Customers? Make a list of the ten customers that you have the most contact with. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) Now use the chart on page two to divide the customers into groups. ...read more.

Middle

Conversely people, whose own basic position is Not OK, will often discount their own value or worth. Such discounts may be verbal but can also be non-verbal, such as shrugs and facial gestures - "negative strokes". A fine line needs to be drawn between constructive criticism and discounting. 5. Behaviour at work Many formal and informal policies and procedures in companies may be carried out in such a way to make managers appear more OK than employees. Outward symbols, such as large offices, lunch rooms, flexible hours, etc., given to senior managers, provide a sense of prestige and power. Managers should use those symbols, however, to get the job done effectively, not as ways to flaunt position and power. Attempting to make employees feel Not OK can lead them to become apathetic, compliant or rebellious. In the work situation the four life or psychological positions can be explained, as follows: I'm OK, you're OK - "This is what I think, what do you think?" The manager gets work done by committing, self-directing, co-operating, exploring and informing. I'm OK, you're not OK - "Do it or else." People are used but not developed. Work is done by threatening, controlling, dominating, manipulating and persuading. I'm not OK, you're OK - "I never know what to do." This person depends upon others and gets work done by abdicating and hiring competent employees. I'm not OK, you're not OK - "Nothing can be done." This person gets work done by withdrawing or doing nothing. Key variables in I'm OK, you're OK are: - information is shared - trust is built through teamwork - dilemmas are openly discussed and the basis of decisions is understood by all concerned. - people are basically solution-oriented, when they deal with problems alone or in groups. 6. Personal power Organisational power is often thought to be related directly to a person's formal position and authority in the organisation structure. ...read more.

Conclusion

She looked at her watch, it was 6.30, time to go home and face the family. The next morning Sandra arrives at work as usual, and begins to wade through the piles of customer orders and invoices left from last week when Alex arrives. "Can you clear all of the invoices by lunch time please Sandra, and I've got visitors this afternoon so I want you to get coffee and biscuits." Sandra reminds Alex of the orders that are outstanding but he is adamant that the invoices are more important. Sandra spends the morning clearing all of the invoices and when lunchtime comes she is glad of the opportunity to get out of the office to get the coffee and biscuits for Alex's visitors. On her return, Sandra is greeted by a very red faced man who immediately begins waving a pile of papers at her and demanding to know why he hasn't received his order that was placed a week ago and promised for last Friday. Sandra explains to the customer that she does not know why he has not received his order, but if he would like to take a seat she will look into it for him. Sandra knows quite well why the order has not been received, so from the other office she telephones the warehouse to put the order up right away. When Sandra goes back into the other office she finds Alex dealing with another annoyed customer who also seems to be complaining about an order. '"Sandra this man says you were rude to him on the telephone last night, and this other man hasn't received his order what's going on?" Discussion Points 1 Why do you think that the level of service has dropped at Simpsons in recent months? 2. What do you think could be done to solve the problems of the two irate customers? 3. How would you re-organise the work load to prevent this from happening again? 4. What should Sandra do to make Alex aware that he caused the problems? Sandwell Training Association Customer Focus February 2001 Page 1 of 34 ...read more.

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