• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12

"Employment in Ireland: composition, growth and future prospects. Discuss."

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Table of Contents: Title Introduction..........................................................................Page 3 Employment Growth...............................................................Pages 4 -9 * The Labour Force................................................................Pages 4 - 7 Population Growth & Emigration/Immigration.........................Pages 4 - 5 Graph 1: "Irish Population Aged 15 - 64 Years, 1980 - 2001".........Page 5 Female Labour Force Participation.........................................Pages 5 - 6 Table 1: "Female Labour Force Participation Rates (000's)"..........Page 6 Labour Force Education......................................................Pages 6 - 7 * General Growth..................................................................Pages 7 - 9 Table 2: "Total at work, Unemployed, Labour Force and Net Migration 1986-2000"...............................................Page 8 Graph 2: "Employment in Ireland 1986 - 2001".........................Page 9 Composition:.......................................................................Pages 9 -11 * Employment by sector.........................................................Pages 9 - 10 Table 3: "Employment in Ireland by Sector, 1980 -2000"............Page 10 * Part-Time and Temporary Employment.................................Pages 10 - 11 Graph 3: "Part Time employed men and women as % of all women and men in Ireland and EU 1986 - 2001"................Page 11 Future Prospects...............................................................Pages 12 - 13 Conclusion.......................................................................Pages 13 - 14 Bibliography....................................................................Pages 14 - 15 Introduction: "Employment in Ireland: composition, growth and future prospects. Discuss." In order to answer this question in a detailed manner, I have chosen to concentrate my focus on three particular time periods in Irish economic history, namely the 1980's, 1990's and 2000 onwards (i.e. the present day). The periods of the 1980's and 1990's represent two completely different economic periods in Irish economic history, and convey the massive turnaround the Irish economy experienced, from economic depression and low levels of employment in the 1980's, to the economic boom and soaring employment levels of the 1990's, a period known now as "The Celtic Tiger". ...read more.

Middle

But even when levels of economic activity revived from 1987 onwards, employment was slow to respond - Tansey, Paul (1998). The 1990's showed a remarkable turnaround in Irish economic fortunes, with growth in GDP amounting to 79% over the decade, giving rise to increases in employment in the 1990's, to a marked fall in unemployment, as can be seen from Table 2 below, with a fall from 228,000 unemployed in 1986, to just 65,000 in 2001. Table 2: Total at work,Unemployed, Labour Force and Net Migration 1986-2001 Year At Work Unemployed Labour Force Unemployment Rate Net Migration 000's 000's 000's % 000's 1986 1,080 228 1,308 17.4 -28 1987 1,090 233 1,323 17.6 -23 1988 1,090 215 1,308 16.7 -42 1989 1,088 201 1,289 15.6 -44 1990 1,134 176 1,310 13.4 -23 1991 1,134 208 1,342 15.5 -2 1992 1,139 221 1,289 16.3 2 1993 1,183 220 1,310 15.7 0 1994 1,221 211 1,342 14.7 -5 1995 1,282 177 1,360 12.1 -2 1996 1,329 179 1,403 11.9 8 1997 1,380 159 1,432 10.3 15 1998 1,495 127 1,459 7.8 23 1999 1,591 97 1,508 5.7 19 2000 1,671 75 1,539 4.3 20 2001 1,717 65 1,622 3.7 26 Source: Labour Force Survey 1986 - 2001. During this period, employment was at 95%, well above the EU average and employment grew at 5% per annum for the previous five years. As can be seen from graph 2 below, there was a substantial increase in employment during the years 1986 and 2001, with employment in 1986 at 1,028,000 workers, rising in 2001 to almost full levels, of 1,717,000 workers in 2001. ...read more.

Conclusion

and skilled workforce.5 Conclusion: The period of 1980 to the present day in terms of economic growth and employment growth is unique in Irish history. Never before has Ireland experienced such a turnaround in economic fortunes, from the depression and recession, high unemployment rates and low living standards of the 1980's, to the economic boom, almost full employment levels and living standards above the EU average of the mid to late1990's, as outlined above. Ireland has come an extremely long way in terms of employment levels, although recently this extraordinary growth has seemed to level off, to relatively normal growth rates in relation to the rest of the EU. As outlined above, female participation rates in employment have increased, Ireland's workforce is becoming highly educated and has moved into a more knowledge and information based environment. This period in Irish economic history is unlikely to be repeated. The long-term outlook for the future is good, with an average annual growth rate equal to the EU average expected. 1 The unemployment rate peaked at approximately 17% of the Irish labour force in 1986, according to the Central Statistics Office. 2 Part time work in Ireland is described as those workers who work less then 30 hours a week. 3 Temporary employment is defined as where a worker is employed by a firm under a fixed-term contract. - O' Hagan, J. W., (ed.), (2000) 4 ESRI Medium Term Review 2001 - 2007. 5 As mentioned previously, companies now look at a highly educated workforce as an extremely valuable asset and as a means of competitive advantage. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Economy & Economics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Economy & Economics essays

  1. Case Study: The Home Depot

    The normal average store is about 128,000 square feet. So, the size of the planned smaller stores is still less than half the normal size of a Home Depot store. So, we can conclude that Home Depot cannot stall all its products in such a planned smaller store. They will have to limit the range of the smaller stores, to the products that really sell only.

  2. This report will establish the opportunities and threats presented to Sony by the EU ...

    Sony because of their good reputation because they fairly treat and involve workers. Therefore productivity rises and less conflict. 2.7) Many EU policies affect Sony because they are a large company whether they join or don't join the EURO. These policies will impact how Sony competes within Europe but they have to respond without losing competitiveness.

  1. China or India? Many companies ask themselves this question. Due to saturated markets, increasing ...

    Personal space is another mater that can arouse misunderstandings in business negotiations. Mores, values and norms are as well very different from western cultures. For example it is common and also essential to exchange gifts. We would probably see that as bribery.

  2. GDP and Growth

    In addition, 'Real' GDP is used to measure the standard of living in the country. The calculation is the GDP divided by the population and it is known as the GDP per capita. The advantages to use GDP per capita as an indicator of standard living are that most countries

  1. Causes of the Great Depression

    The problem with such heavy concentrations of wealth and such massive dependence upon essentially two industries is similar to the problem with few people having too much wealth. The economy is reliant upon those industries to expand and grow and invest in order to prosper.

  2. Differences between the standards of living in Slovakia and The Hague

    Number of people working fulltime/part time Full Part 28 22 If the country has a higher part time working people, it means people spend less time at work and take care of their children or do other things. Although Part time jobs can have their positives, they have their negatives,

  1. The Celtic tiger is difficult to discern in terms of productivity (Walsh 2000) Discuss.

    (Clinch, Convery and Walsh 2002) This growth in employment, which was viewed as phenomenal, was said to be more than double than that of even America's well-known high employment level. Walsh (2000) says that the increase of output per person employed is a more realistic measure than that of the increase of Gross National Product.

  2. New banknotes and coins for Europe.

    co-operate in the field of economic policy with other, weaker, countries, which are more tolerant to higher inflation. 5. The one off cost of introducing the single currency will be significant. The British Retailing Consortium estimates that British retailers will have to pay between £1.7 billion and £3.5 billion to make the changes necessary.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work