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"Human resource Development (HRD) is a fundamental element of successful human resource management. Describe the stages in the HRD model and compare and contrast this with the systematic training model."

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Introduction

"Human resource Development (HRD) is a fundamental element of successful human resource management. Describe the stages in the HRD model and compare and contrast this with the systematic training model." Human Resource Development (HRD) is the means used to support the mission of human resource management, which is to maximize employee performance. The purpose of HRD is to provide people the means by which to perform their current job or any other tasks they will be performing in the foreseeable future. HRD either creates or enhances the capability of the employee. HRD balances management's need for a competent workforce with employees' needs for successful careers. Thus, HRD focuses on employee and organizational capability. Human Resource Development can also be defined by its functions: Performance Assessment and appraisal Needs assessment and analysis Development Activities Evaluation and Transfer of learning Each of these elements can be linked together to give a HRD model, see diagram below: EXPLAIN STAGES The performance of the employee is under a continuous cycle of assessment and analysis by their line manager. ...read more.

Middle

At first thought this seams practical, but not all employees work as well as others, new employees will pick up bad habits along with the good ones, they in turn passed the bad habits on to new employees when they became settled in their job and this process continued throughout the years are company efficiency therefore decreased. In 1962 the Minister of Labour was gave the statutory powers to set up Industrial Training Boards (ITBs) containing representatives from both sides of industry. Each was responsible for: * Overseeing training in its industry, * Setting standards * Providing advice to firms. And most importantly, Each paid allowances to trainees that were financed via a compulsory levy on firms in its industry. This levy / grant system was designed resolve the failure of the labour market to deliver sufficient skilled workers and to end the 'poaching' of firms best workers. Along with ITBs, the industrial training act also established the Systematic Training model. The outline of which can be seen below: IDENTIFY TRAINGIN NEEDS AND SPECIFY OBJECTIVES DESIGN & DEVELOP A PROGRAM IMPLEMENT A PROGRAM EVALUATE TRAINING The systematic training model can be defined ...read more.

Conclusion

A systems approach ensures a comprehensive training process that remains focused on the needs of the organization. The process typically includes the phases: 1. Analyze the organization's needs and identify training goals which, when reached, will equip learner's with knowledge and skills to meet the organization's needs. Usually this phase also includes identifying when training should occur and who should attend as learners. 2. Design a training system that learners and trainers can implement to meet the learning goals; typically includes identifying learning objectives (which culminate in reaching the learning goals), needed facilities, necessary funding, course content, lessons and sequence of lessons 3. Develop a training "package" of resources and materials, including, e.g., developing audio-visuals, graphics, manuals, etc. 4. Implement the training package, including delivering the training, support group feedback, clarifying training materials, administering tests and conducting the final evaluation. This phase can include administrative activities, such as copying, scheduling facilities, taking attendance data, billing learners, etc. 5. Evaluate training, including before, during and after implementation of training In a systematic approach to training, each phase of the process produces results needed by the next phase. For example, the training analysis phase produces learning goals that are used by the next phase, training design. ...read more.

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