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Human resource management.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIPS AND EMPLOYMENT MARKETS CHANGES AND INFLUENCES COLIN BELL International Business Studies Registration no. 32520100 E-mail - bonzo2drink@hotmail.com Bmg323c1 Ann-Marie Doherty Submission Date 29th November 2002 Question With reference to the employment relationship and employment market, discuss the reasons for the changing dynamics of the contemporary employment market, that is, the rise in flexible working, and the resultant range of job patterns, which characterise the modern workplace. These issued should be addressed in the context of your own area of study and supplemented with appropriate examples and case studies. INTRODUCTION The term's "employee relations" and more traditionally, "industrial relations" are used to indicate those areas of the employment relationship in which mangers deal with the representatives of employee's rather than managing employee's directly as individuals. (Edwards 1995). This essay will endeavour to examine the interaction between employer and employees. It will also examine the dynamic work patterns shaping the modern employment market and reasons why many organisations are adapting a range of suitable job patterns for their employee's. As these job patterns occur legislation has developed concerning Contingent Employment. The proposed thought that flexible job patterns could help firms, as a whole will be discussed later, along with whether or not employees need a source of protection from employers. Although there is legislation that covers a vast area of employee's rights, the balance of power was thought to still have laid with the employer in the early 1990's. This was because legislation through the 1980's aggressively hit the trade unions, cutting their powers. At this time redundancies and unemployment was high, so employers had to reassure employees that they were being valued and were being treated equally and fairly and that there was no imbalance of power. WORKING CONDITIONS AND FLEXIBILITY WITHIN ORGANISATIONS. As we can see in everyday life our world is ever changing. We only have to look at supermarkets that are open for business seven days a week along with many more businesses, such as restaurants and public houses. ...read more.

Middle

They also miss out on a range of benefits, such as equal pay and pensions that are automatically given to permanent staff. While there is some protection for temporary workers, many do not have access to sick leave or holiday pay. So what rights do you have if you're a temporary worker? Every worker including those who work on a temporary basis or on a fixed term contract is entitled to 20 days holiday (including bank holidays) each year from their employer. Under old rules people could not start earning time off until they had worked for 13 weeks. Since 25th October 2001 and following a European Court ruling, workers can start earning paid leave from day one. This was due to arguments that bosses were trying to avoid paid leave by offering 13-week contracts. If the temporary worker is working through an agency i.e. Grafton Recruitment, the agency is their employer not the company they work for on a day-to-day basis. All workers must be paid at least the minimum wage and some employers believe companies that pay more than the law in certain industries builds loyalty. Unfair Dismissal Unfair Dismissal can be claimed if a worker continuously has worked for the same company for one year. However, there are quite a few loopholes for people who do not meet this criteria, which can help temporary workers. These may include pregnancy or if your boss is unwilling to provide an itemised payslip. Pay and Pensions Temporary staff is not entitled to equal pay or pensions as these offered to permanent staff. Trade Union Congress wants the governments to include these benefits within a European Union Directive. Fixed Term Contracts Newly appointed staff on fixed term contracts, or staff on recently extended contracts may no longer waive their rights to claim unfair dismissal. This does not affect staff appointed on fixed term contracts commencing prior to 25th December 1999 unless the appointment is extended after this date. ...read more.

Conclusion

This meant Hayley could still take her son home every lunch- time and he became more settled. She then returned to normal working hours once her son settled. Without this arrangement she would have been unable to return to work. Managing Director Ian Greenaway quoted "the company employs 30 brains as well as 30 arms and legs". Findings showed flexibility with employees allows them to reciprocate. Its not just the case of people working reduced hours, if people are allowed to work hours or work patterns that balance their work and home lives experience shows they are likely to contribute more to the business. CONCLUSION This essay has examined the different job patterns organisation have adapted with relation to Atkinson flexible firm model 1984 and legalisation concerning contingent workers. In my opinion businesses need to be smarter when it comes to beating these common problems. Work-life balance policies such as flexible working, job sharing and employee benefits don't require a huge cash investment - just a good approach. Employers have to start to realise that employee's are much happier when there is a balance between work-life and this is likely to reflect in their work. BIBLOGRAPHY Cornelius, N. (2001) Human Resource Management: A Managerial Perspective, International Thomson Business Press, London, 2nd edition. Foot, M. and Hook, C. (1999) Introducing Human Resource Management, Prentice Hall, London. 2nd edition. Lines, D. and Martin, B. (1997) A-Z Business Studies Hand Book, Greengate publishing, London. 2nd edition. Redman, T and Wilkinson, A. (2002) Contemporary Human Resource Management Text and Cases, Prentice Hall, London. Journal Articles Anonymous. (2002) "The British Journal of Administrative Management" Employee Relations, Vol. 24 No. 14. Richbell, S. (2001) "International Journal of Manpower", Employee Relations, Vol. 22 No.3. Ward, K. and Grimshaw, D. and Ruberry, R. (2001) "Human Resource Management Journal" London, Vol.11 No. 4, pp.3-21. Welsh, P. and Harwitz, F. (2001) "Journal of Industrial Relations" Vol. 26 No.3, pp.252-272. Wong, M,L. (2001) "Human Resource Management Journal" London, Vol. 4 No. 15 pp. 22-27. E-mail web sites. www.dfee.gov.uk www.dti.gov.uk www.education.man.ac.uk www.hesda.org.uk www.ofsted.gov.uk www. Rhul.ac.uk www.thompsons.law.co.uk ...read more.

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