• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18

Management of Services and People

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Management of Services and People 'There is no simple tool-kit or beginner's guide to managing any organisation. Instead managers have to be prepared to listen, learn, understand and be part of the dynamic of their organisation. They must find a way in which management adds to the organisation rather than constrains it.' (Taken from Lawrie, 1998). Lawrie's comment implies that managing an organisation is a continual process of experiential learning and that there are no set of techniques that would guarantee the successful management of all organisations. His words suggest that managers learn to manage specific organisations whilst 'on the job' or 'as they go along' and that this will enable them to find the most appropriate method or style of management in any given situation. Whilst I believe that a number of newly appointed managers (myself included) find themselves managing an organisation for which they have had little formal training or preparation, there are many theories about what management should achieve and what skills and abilities are needed to achieve them that are common to all organisations. I would also argue that many of these management skills are used on a regular basis in the day to day practice of non-managers since 'managing people is at the heart both of providing services to users, families and wider communities.' (Coulshed & Mullender, 2001:13). This assignment will look at the role of management in general and the tasks of supervision and partnership working in detail, in order to examine these theories by applying them to my own experience of managing Loughborough Nightstop. Loughborough Nightstop is a non-profit making organisation and is therefore part of what is commonly called the 'voluntary sector'. Beginning some 7 years ago, Nightstop works with young people who are in some kind of 'housing need' and we provide supported housing and resettlement services. It has grown considerably over the past three years as can be demonstrated financially by the fact that it initially had an annual turnover of some �13,000 and now has a turnover of over �250,000 per annum. ...read more.

Middle

They describe the overall purpose of supervision as 'the service to users within the limits of agency task, professional knowledge and financial resources' (Hughes & Pengelly, 2002:40). Most managers including myself would agree that the practicalities of supervision concern the regularity of supervision, its priority, the need for privacy and uninterrupted space and time and a supervisory contract. Whilst I have used contracts in supervision in the past I have not used them so far in Nightstop. However, they would be a particularly useful tool in allowing both myself and the supervisee time to discuss in detail the purpose of supervision especially as at present I have several fairly new members of staff who are not familiar with this aspect of professional development. One such member of staff repeatedly says she does not need supervision and it is okay if it is only monthly, but she then rings me on a regular basis every week to check things out. It would probably be a much more beneficial use of our time if we met formally on a weekly basis until she was more established in post. Coulshed and Mullender's views on supervision echo those of Hughes and Pengelly since they describe supervision as combining elements of management, education and support. They argue that 'the organisation as a whole needs frameworks which encompass these same three elements, which - become performance appraisal, staff development and staff care' (Coulshed & Mullender, 2001:162). Achieving the most appropriate balance between these three potentially conflicting responsibilities is undoubtedly difficult but extremely important if supervision is to have any value. For example, 'if support is treated as an end of supervision, there is a danger of a collusive focus on the workers needs for their own sake rather that a focus on the worker in order to promote a better service' (Hughes & Pengelly, 2002:48). In a recent supervision session, I had to combine informing an employee that her performance was not up to standard with support in enabling her to improve. ...read more.

Conclusion

This does not sit easily if as an organisation we are committed to principles of social justice. However Himmelman argues that 'the sharing of power amongst different stakeholders is the only way to achieve the vision of social justice' (Sullivan & Skelcher, 2002:38). This can only be possible, I would argue, where members of the community are included as stakeholders. Himmelman (1996) believes that through 'collaborative betterment' agencies can create systems where the community is invited to play a part, as is often the case, but that 'collaborative empowerment' would lead to a 'capacity to set priorities and control resources that are essential for increasing community self determination. The process starts with community organisation and then spreads out to engage public, private and other organisations in the collaborative activity' (Sullivan & Skelcher, 2002:38). Thus partnership working holds the promise of working towards a more inclusive agenda if we can involve members of the community in that partnership. In Loughborough and amongst the partnerships with which I am currently involved this is far from the case at present but the possibility is there for the future. Being a good or effective manager is, I would argue, more than the simple learning involved in managing one organisation, even if skills are developed to suit that particular organisation. The need for organisations to interact with a wide variety of institutions, organisations, partners and individuals mean that a broader complement of skills are needed if the organisation is to exist successfully in a changing environment. Thus at Nightstop, all aspects of management, including my own, need to reflect our values and commitment. Only in this way can we be sure that we 'pursue not only (our) early values of respect for persons, but also new principles of equality, social justice and the highest achievable standards of service for hitherto marginalised and devalued groups within society' (Coulshed & Mullender, 2001:10). Our commitment therefore needs to be a tangible aspect of our practice including management, supervision and partnership working. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE People in Business section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE People in Business essays

  1. The relationship between management theory and practice.

    moved away from approaches that relied purely on a consideration of structural or human relations issues in favor of more comprehensive perspectives. Early ideas about management were propounded at a time when organizations were thought of as machines requiring efficient systems to enable them to function effectively.

  2. Produce a case study comparing two business organisations, investigating the extent to which each ...

    Tesco also gather information from their customers using a Clubcard. They are able to see each customer's buying habits. Also BA Miles can be earned through your Tesco Clubcard. Tesco Clubcard holders are sent reward vouchers at three-monthly intervals. The value of the voucher depends on how much customers spent in Tesco stores during preceding quarter.

  1. Operations Management.

    That will give the company a complete controlling system.. Moreover, workers on the assembly line should be incentive to inspect the quality spontaneously. Since London Zoo provide service to the customers, except for those objective quality characteristic, they should have good control of the service quality of their staff.

  2. The Nature and Purpose of Project Management.

    Each step has a matching validation process which can, where defects are found, cause a loop back to the corresponding development stage and a reworking of the following steps. Ideally this feedback should only occur where a discrepancy has been found between what was specified by a particular activity and

  1. Business at Work - ASDA

    This also provides the managers of the business with further information as to see which particular workers are doing well, and have the ability to work with different departments if promoted. The size of an organisation is important as regards to which culture should be used.

  2. A REPORT INTO HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AT SAINSBURY'S

    Vacancies arising in their Business Centre are filled using a combination of internal transfers and new external hires. This combines excellent career development opportunities for their existing colleagues but also ensures that they use effective and leading-edge skills and experience from the wider market.

  1. What products and services do you think are at Drayton Manor?

    * The rides within the Pirate cove are called the Excalibur, other rides that are included in this theme are A Dragon's Tale, Pirate adventure, Dodgems, Jolly Buccaneer and Pirate Raft Ride. * The rides within the Fisherman's Wharf area are that the main ride within this theme is the

  2. What is the purpose of management theory? Explain how knowledge to understanding of management ...

    Frank Gilbreth, known as the Father of Time and Motion Studies, filmed individual physical labor movements. This enabled the manager to break down a job into its component parts and streamline the process. His wife, Lillian Gilbreth, was a psychologist and author of The Psychology of Work.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work