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"Managers who rely on pay to motivate their employees to higher levels of job performance will always be disappointed with the results." Critically evaluate this statement.

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Introduction

ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR 1 - ESSAY QUESTION 2 "Managers who rely on pay to motivate their employees to higher levels of job performance will always be disappointed with the results." Critically evaluate this statement. Organisational Behaviour Organisational Behaviour Behaviour References Broadfield, A & Rollinson, D. (2002). Organisational Behaviour and Analysis: An integrated Approach, 2nd Edition, P.197, 203, 204, 209. Kohn, A. (1993). Why incentive plans cannot Work, Harvard Business Review, September - October, P.54. Marsden, D & Richardson, R. (1994). Performing for Pay? The Effects of 'Merit Pay' on Motivation in a Public Service. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 32, 243-261. Retrieved on 15th October 2004 from: http://www.tutor2u.net/business/people/motivation_theory_taylor.asp Humans are always affected by their surroundings. Motivators try to overcome barriers, which stop people being motivated. Certain theories suggest people work harder under certain conditions. (Broadfield & Rollinson 2002). One of the most adopted theories by managers, is Maslow's Hierachy of Needs. Maslow's theory assumes that: "human needs are inexhaustible: as one set of needs is satisfied, another rises in its place, which means that needs are arranged in a hierarchy." (Maslow, 1954). Maslow's Hierachy, includes: physiological, security, affiliation, esteem needs, and self-actualisation. ...read more.

Middle

(Taylor) Taylor decided managers would benefit from his theories, purely because if the member of staff did not work, then they would not receive a fair day's pay. However, if they met the targets, which were seen as a motivator, then the employee would receive extra bonuses. (Taylor) Critics have argued that Taylor's theory may work well with some, but it ignores the differences between people. Money may well motivate some, (extrinsic rewards which are tangible) however, things other than financial rewards might motivate others. For example, McClelland's Theory of Learned Needs suggests that some people (depending on the societies values acquired) have a desire to achieve, far more than to earn money i.e. intrinsic rewards like using skills or social rewards. (McClelland, 1967). This implies that managers who employ staff with the desire to achieve, will not be influenced by pay. This theory is all so backed by Kohn who said: "Incentives do not alter the attitude that underlie our behaviours." (Kohn A, 1993). If this is the case, then it would be very difficult for an employer to use other means to motivate, because of their society values. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, it could be said that managers would benefit from the increased staff pay to boost short term effects, but they will be dissatisfied with the results in the long term. The evidence suggests that Herzberg (1959) is right, in general in terms of his hygiene factors, but this system does not apply across the board. However, for most managers, the idea that adhering to the minimum working environment requirements, managers will not de-motivate staff, nor will it encourage people to remain in employment with the same company for many years. Word Count: 1096 The assignment's aim, is to give a critical understanding of how managers relying on pay to motivate their employees to higher levels of job performance, may or may not be satisfied with the outcome. Humans are always affected by their surroundings. Motivators try to overcome barriers, which stop people being motivated. Certain theories suggest people work harder under certain conditions. (Broadfield & Rollinson 2002). This involves researching theories of motivation, and then discussing what each say about pay as a motivator. I will then evaluate how worthwhile the information is, based on whether or not the theory is well regarded and supported by the researched literature. Introduction 5 Joshua Coleman 1450212 ...read more.

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