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Occupational stress: Managing pressure at work

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Introduction

Table of Contents Topic Page Number Synopsis......................................................2 Introduction..................................................3 Identifying stressors at work..............................4 The outcomes of stress at work...........................6 Making the most of pressure at work.....................7 Overcoming pressure at work...........................10 Conclusion..................................................11 References..................................................12 Synopsis Occupational stress: Managing pressure at work Introduction In recent years, occupational stress and health have gained considerable importance to people in all forms life. Keeping in mind, the excessive work load, amount of time spent at work and the recent changes that are affecting the nature of work, it is not surprising that work stress today is increasing (Szymanski, 1999). Stress can be caused due to a number of reasons and in many ways and those things are know as stressors which may vary from person to person. According to the United States National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (1999), job stress can be defined as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. It can also lead to poor health and even injury. http://www.ilo.org/public/english/protection/safework/stress/whatis.htm People should be made more aware about the symptoms of stress and try to precautionary measures before it affect their lives. Stress at work can affect people both mentally and physically. ...read more.

Middle

It will also have an impact on a worker's psychological and physical health. Psychological consequences may include anxiety, boredom, low self-esteem, forgetfulness, depression, anger, apathy, or worry. Physical consequences may include, but are certainly not limited to, headaches, diabetes, fatigue, hypertension, chest and back pain, ulcers, or even infectious diseases. (site bbc). A few examples of occupations which have high levels of stress are miner, officers, construction workers, pilots and journalists. Some of the recent studies which are related to the costs of work related stress show that in the UK, over 40 million working days are lost each year due to stress-related disorders. In Australia, the Federal Assistant Minister for Industrial relations estimated the cost of occupational stress to be around $30 million in 1994.Whereas, in the US; over half of the 550 million working days lost each year due to absenteeism are stress-related. http://www.ilo.org/public/english/protection/safework/stress/whatis.htm Making the most of pressure at work Establishing resource for change At work, organisational change or technology have also been identified as stress factors. Change causes conflict and discomfort, the effects of which are often underestimated. Therefore, a change in ones behaviour, approach or circumstance is a potential factor of stress in itself. If you are not motivated by your job or do not enjoy the rewards it gives you, then adapting by improving your time-management skills is not going to help you. ...read more.

Conclusion

This will help you to resolve crises. Use of diary to write down deadlines, appointments and meetings will help you to retain information so that you will not miss them. Delegation Delegating work can be an excellent way of making the best out the possible resources. You can divert demands away from you, while making the person to whom you have delegated the task feel needed and part of the team. You must be very clear about the information and instruction you give, and what you expect to receive back. You must choose someone with the appropriate skills and resources to complete the task. Time-management If you want to use time more effectively, then you have to start from knowing what you are doing now. Disorganization, unclear goals, too many personal phone calls, no routines, poor planning, procrastination, lack of focus, lack of training, junk e-mail, internet surfing, etc. are all factors that steal our time and people often don't make the connection that this is why they never have enough time. Working in this state is an absolute source for stress. You will get more work done if you establish routines and stick with them as much as you can, but you have to stay flexible and adaptable to the unexpected. Otherwise, when unplanned things happen, it'll cause you just as much stress as trying to work without a plan. ...read more.

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