• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Size and characteristics of markets.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Size and characteristics of markets France France is in the midst of transition, from a well to do modern economy that has featured extensive government ownership and intervention to one that relies more on market mechanisms. The Socialist led government has partially or fully privatised may large companies, banks and insurers, but still retains controlling stakes in several leading firms, including Air France, France Telecom, Renault and Thales and remains dominant in come sectors particularly power, public transport and defence industries. The telecommunications sector is gradually being opened to competition. France's leaders remain committed to a capitalism in which they maintain social equity by means of laws, tax policies, and social spending that reduce income disparity and the impact of free markets on public heath and welfare. The current government has lowered income taxes and introduced measures to boost employment levels. At the end of 2002 the government was focusing on the problems of the high cost of labour and labour market inflexibility resulting from the 35-hour working week and restrictions on lay offs. The government was also pushing for pension reforms and simplification of administrative policies. ...read more.

Middle

Germanys ageing population, combined with high unemployment, has pushed social security outlays to a level exceeding contributions from workers. Structural rigidities in the labour market that includes strict regulations on laying off workers and the setting of wages on a national basis have made unemployment a major problem. Growth in 2002 and 2003 fell short of 1% that could allow Germany to meet the long-term challenges of European economic integration and globalisation, particularly if labour market rigidities are further addressed. In the short run, however, the fall in government revenues and the rise in expenditures have raised the deficit about the EU's 3% debt limit. GDP Purchasing power parity �2.16 trillion (2002) GDP (real growth rate) 0.2% (2002) GDP (composition by sector) Agriculture: 1% Industry: 31% Services: 68% (2002) Population below poverty line N/A Inflation rate (consumer prices) 1.3% (2002) Labour force 41.9 million (2001) Unemployment rate 9.8% (2002) Industries Amongst the worlds largest and most technologically advanced producers of iron, steel, coal, cement, chemicals, machinery, vehicles, machine tools, electronics, food and beverages, ship building, textiles. Exports (Commodities) ...read more.

Conclusion

The relatively good economic performance has complicated the Blair government's efforts to make a case for Britain to join the European Economic and Monetary Union. Meanwhile, the government has been speeding up the improvement of education, transport and health services at a cost in high taxes. The war in March to April 2003 between a US led coalition and Iraq, together with the subsequent problems of restoring the economy and the polity, involve a heavy commitment of British Military forces. GDP Purchasing power parity �1528 trillion (2002) GDP (real growth rate) 1.8% (2002) GDP (composition by sector) Agriculture: 1.4% Industry: 24.9% Services: 73.7% Population below poverty line 7% Inflation rate (consumer prices) 2.1% (2002) Labour force 29.7 million (2001) Unemployment rate: 5.2% (2002) Industries Machine tools, electronic power equipment, automation equipment, railroad equipment, shipbuilding, aircraft, motor vehicles and parts, electronics and communications equipment, metals, chemicals, coal, petroleum, paper and paper products, food processing, textiles, clothing and other consumer goods. Exports (Commodities) Manufactured goods, fuels, chemicals, food, beverages, tobacco. Exports (partners) US 15.5%, Germany 11.2%, France 9.4%, Ireland 8%, Netherlands 7.15, Belgium 5.2%, Italy 4.4%, Spain 4.3% Imports (Commodities) Manufactured goods, machinery, fuel, foodstuffs. Imports (partners) Germany 12.9%, USA 11.9%, France 7.8%, Netherlands 6.3%, Belgium 5%, Italy 4% (2002) Currency British pound Laura Robinson 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Economy & Economics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Economy & Economics essays

  1. What were the main characteristics of Early Modern Europe?

    Discovery of the Americas meant that countries on the fringe of Western Europe, such as England, Spain, France and Portugal, began to dominate trade. The countries explored included Asia, Africa and the Americas. Potatoes, tomatoes and maize from America began to change the Europeans' diet.

  2. Toyota Motor Company Limited

    having Japanese literacy to work for Toyota's affiliates operating in foreign countries. This helps business move smoothly. However, it still keeps high-income positions for Japanese employees who will control local employees in order to protect its intangible assets. In Indonesia, for instance, Toyota Indonesia hires employees who have Japanese literacy.

  1. Retailing In India - A Government Policy Perspective

    banks and to entry barriers for new competitors, banking in any country is less competitive than other businesses. In Brazil this problem is exacerbated by high interest rates that make it more profitable to lend to the government than to consumers and by the lack of competition from nonbank players

  2. Split Votes: A Nation Divided on the Marijuana/Drug Legalization Debate

    and educate him or her about the potential risks and benefits associated with marijuana smoking. Rami Zheman started the chain of letters by writing about a friend who lost his financial aid and will not be able to finish school due to a marijuana possession charge.

  1. This report will establish the opportunities and threats presented to Sony by the EU ...

    not keep profits high for Sony if they are caught in this position. For Sony to be price competitive they may have to merge but this will cause a few predicaments. For instance, when merging, staff have to be rationalised this would then mean loss of some employees through redundancies.

  2. Cotton Textiles In Preston

    This meant England lost their own home market. While this was going on other countries were making new and better machines. Preston mills weren't big enough to produce enough cotton to compete with other companies in foreign countries. One of the results in this decline is that I can see that mills had been knocked down over years gone by.

  1. The Famous Grouse - company profile and exports

    Expenditures on health, education, and pensions will increase proportionately. Statistics on New Zealand* GDP: Purchasing power parity - $85.34 billion (2004 est.) GDP - real growth rate: 3.5% (2004 est.) GDP - per capita: Purchasing power parity - $21,600 (2004 est.)

  2. The Quest for Optimal Asset Allocation Strategies in Integrating Europe.

    leaves exposure to 'systematic' risk, the unpredictable losses that affect all domestic securities (this systematic risk is often assumed to be reflected by the variability of excess returns in a market-value weighted index portfolio). Systematic risk comes from the common exposure of assets to economy-wide risk factors, such as the business cycle, interest rates and exchange rates.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work