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The importance of human resources within an organization.

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Introduction

"It is in fact difficult to imagine how an organisation could effectively hire, train, appraise, compensate or use its human resources without the kinds of information derived from job analysis" (Ivancevich 1995, as cited by Stone 2002:129) The importance of human resources within an organization is becoming increasingly understood in today's rapidly changing and uncertain business environment (Davidson & Griffin 2000: 18). In order to assist employees in helping an organisation to reach its strategic business goals, effective human resource managers often gather job related information in a job analysis and job description, which is vital to creating or re-designing jobs which provide employees with a high level of job satisfaction (Stone 2002: 123). The basic human resource activity of gathering detailed information about a particular job's duties, tasks and responsibilities, can help organisations achieve strategic goals more efficiently and effectively by avoiding both duplication and overlapping of work in jobs, and also providing a job description by which employers are able to recruit and select the most appropriate employees for the job (Stone 2002: 128). By conducting a regular job analysis in order to create effective job descriptions, and utilising this information effectively, managers are able to design jobs keep employees motivated, performing at a high level and willing to retain their jobs, all while simultaneously utilising the element of human resources to achieve the organisation's goals (Davidson & Griffin 2000: 18) ...read more.

Middle

For example, the problem of an employee identified as having an unsatisfactory level of production or skill for his or her job may be rectified by either deployement, or offering the employee training and development programs dervided from the infromation of a job analysis (Stone 2002: 128). In this way, human resource managers can utilise the benefits of a job analysis to affect and improve an employees level of performance, thereby also assisting the company to reach its strategic business goals without the regular problems of job duplication or overlapping, or the costs involved from a high level of employee turnover (Stone 2002: 128) (Allen & Griffeth 1999). The effects of job analysis and design on the way financial incentives are offered in order to decrease employee turnover. In prior studies regarding turnover, the wage received by employees has been overlooked as an influential element which able to increase employee retention in organisations (Guthrie 2002:421). When an organisation has a high rate of turnover amoung high performing employees, the overall effectiveness and functioning of the organisation is affected, with money wasted on recruitment and training new employees (Allen & Griffeth 1999; Mitchell, Holtom, Lee, Sablynski, Erez 2001:1102). Research suggests that money is a motivating factor for many people in employment related decisions (Campion 1991, as cited by Li-Ping Tang et al.2000: 216), and therefore the relationship between employee performance and turnover is most strongly effected by financial rewards (Allen & Griffeth 1999). ...read more.

Conclusion

1994. I spy, you spy (business espionage). Industry Week. 243(4): 35-49 Clifford, J.P. 1996. Manage work better to better manage human resources: A comparative study of two approaches to job analysis. Public Personnel Management. 25 (1): 89-103 David, F. R. & Groom, J. R. 2001. Competitive intelligence activity among small firms. S.A.M. Advanced Management Journal. 66(1):12-20 Davidson, P. & Griffin, R. W. 2000. Management: Australia in a global context. Brisbane: John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Guthrie, P.P. 2001. High-involvement work practices, turnover, and productivity: evidence from New Zealand. Academy of Management Journal, 44 (2): 180-190 Guthrie, J.P. 2002. Alternative pay practices: An organization economics perspective. Group & Organization Management, 25 (4): 419-439 Harvey, R.J. 2002. Functional job analysis. Personnel Psychology, 55 (1) Ivancevich, J.M. 1995. Human Resource Management: Foundations of Personnel, 6th edition. Homewood. Kirschenbaum, A. & Mano-Negrin, R. 1999. Underlying labor market dimensions of "opportunities". Human Relations, 52 (10): 1233-1255 Lambert, Eric G.; Hogan, Nancy Lynne; Barton, Shannon M. 2001. The impact of job satisfaction on turnover intent: a test of a structural measurement model using a national sample of workers. Social Science Journal, 38 (2):233-250 Li-Ping Tang, T.; Jwa K, K.; Shin-Hsiung, D. 2000. Does attitude toward money moderate the relationship between intrinsic job satisfaction and voluntary turnover? Human Relations, 53 (2): 213-245 Mitchell, T.R.; Homtom, B.C.; Lee, T.W.; Sablynski, C.J.; Erez, M. 2001. Why people stay: Using job embeddedness to predict voluntary turnover. Academy of Managemnt Journal, 44 (6): 1102-1121 Stone, R.J. 2002. Human Resource Management. Brisbane: John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. ...read more.

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