• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

This paper describes how logical fallacies can affect individuals and the decisions those make in everyday life. Moreover, the paper will discuss three types of logical fallacies in the inclusion of: Appeal to Emotion, Appeal to Pity, and Ad hominem

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Fallacy Summary and Application Chase Dodson University of Phoenix Critical Thinking: Strategies in Decision Making MGT/350 Ms. Cassandra Molavrh March 13, 2006 Fallacy Summary and Application The ability to identify fallacies in the arguments of others, and to avoid them in one's own arguments, is both valuable and increasingly rare. A fallacy is an "argument" in which the premises given for the conclusion do not provide the needed degree of support (Labossiere, 1991). Fallacious reasoning keeps individuals from knowing the truth, and the inability to think critically makes persons vulnerable to manipulation by those skilled in the art of rhetoric (Logical Fallacies). This paper describes how logical fallacies can affect individuals and the decisions those make in everyday life. Moreover, the paper will discuss three types of logical fallacies in the inclusion of: Appeal to Emotion, Appeal to Pity, and Ad hominem. Furthermore, explaining their significance to critical thinking and discuss its general application to decision making. Fallacies are deceptive errors of thinking. Appeal to Emotion fallacy attempts to evoke an emotional response to convince the listener, and is extremely common in debates over emotionally charged issues like vivisection, abortion, and ...read more.

Middle

Additionally, people's emotion often carries much more force than their reason. Appeal to Pity is a popular fallacy in the retailing business. For example, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina forced thousands of families to relocate in search of a new home as well as new employment. The most popular phrase utilized during an interview is "I was a victim of Hurricane Katrina, and my family is counting on me to get a job." "We lost everything!" An Appeal to Pity is a fallacy in which a person substitutes a claim intended to create pity for evidence in an argument (Labossiere, 1991). The fallacy argument attempts to persuade the manager by provoking feelings of sympathy. For example, an employee has a difficult time with their spending habits thus putting themselves at risk for financial trouble. The employee states:" I need a raise because I do not make enough money to pay the bills." Again, this argument attempts to persuade the manager to give the associate a raise in salary by provoking a sense of sympathy. ...read more.

Conclusion

The store manager argues the fact that the previous store manager should receive total responsibility. Again, The reason why an Ad Hominem (of any kind) is a fallacy is that the character, circumstances, or actions of a person do not (in most cases) have a bearing on the truth or falsity of the claim being made (or the quality of the argument being made) (Labossiere, 1991). Logical fallacies are methods of argumentation or persuasion that, in simplest terms, look or sound good, but do not stand up to critical analysis. The researcher examined how critical thinking is evident by the very fact that it plays a pivotal role in any process of enquiry that is undertaken to arrive at the truth, a sound argument, or an objective opinion. The examples in the paper show how these fallacies are frequently used to get people to agree to desired proposals or plans. Furthermore, the three fallacies that belong to the broader category of logical fallacies, has shown how important it is that critical thinkers develop the necessary skills to ensure that reasoning is based on verifiable facts and relevant premises. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE People in Business section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE People in Business essays

  1. Hagar Cohen's work, Glass, Paper, Beans.

    in the harvester and porter. In order to pay back the loan on time, Brent decided the machines had better operate around the clock" (Hagar-Cohen 1997:139). Because of this calculability and need for efficiency, Brent purchased this machine, needing to pay back the loan that was needed in order to purchase this calculates piece of

  2. Delegation Paper

    He is to design and implement new programs and rates that will drive customer perception of our company as the market leader in the mortgage industry. Our Vice President looks to his Team Managers for feedback on existing programs and new programs that should be introduced.

  1. Organizing Paper

    Then HRC determines and approves the CEO's compensation-based on this evaluation, and recommend the CEO's compensation for ratification by the Board. 3. The HRC is to review and approve for the CEO and the current executive officers of the company, (a)

  2. Organizational Effectiveness Paper

    Even with company growth, the business focus should be maintained and if a secondary product/product line is created, it should be closely related to the first. Dominate companies like IBM, Boeing; Intel and Genentech confine them to the strength product of their firm.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work