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What motivational strategies does Sainsbury's use with its employees to maximise their overall performance?

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Introduction

Business Studies and Economics Coursework By Sarah Hussain 12CH What motivational strategies does Sainsbury's use with its employees to maximise their overall performance? Introduction Sainsbury is a Private Limited Company. It is a leading UK and US food retailer with interests in financial services and property. The group compromises Sainsbury's Supermarkets and Sainsbury Bank in the UK and Shaw's Supermarkets in the US. The Group employed 172,90 people at the end of the year The Groups objective is to meet its customers' needs effectively and thereby provide shareholders with good, sustainable financial returns. It aims to ensure all colleagues have opportunities to develop their abilities and are well rewarded for their contribution to the success of the business. It also aims to fulfil its responsibilities to the communities and environments in which it operates. In order to be a productively successful company Sainsbury's has to make sure that their staff are motivated. If their staff feels motivated in the work practice then the employers can expect a higher output per head. This will explained further later on. I have chosen to analyse the motivation techniques of the managers at J Sainsbury plc. ...read more.

Middle

However when these needs are fulfilled employees will need other things to motivate them. People become motivated to achieve needs such as security and stability, which Maslow called the Safety needs. See Appendix 1 for more details on Maslow's Hierarchy. However there also a few problems that rise with his theory. Does everyone have the same needs? Do different people have different degrees of need. Can the needs ever be fully satisfied? To answer these questions I hade to ask the employees themselves. Managers may not be aware with Maslow's hierarchy but still utilize systems, which will motivate staff. It is obvious that if employees are happy at work they are more likely to produce more good quality products or treat customers in a better way and generally be more productive. Managers notice this and try to use techniques to motivate their staff to increase productivity. Analysis of Secondary Research Sainsbury's try to offer as many benefits as possible to satisfy their employee needs. I found out that Sainsbury's employ around 150,968 out of which 64% are women, 10% are store managers and 13% are ethnic minorities. ...read more.

Conclusion

It means that the workers will be able to fit in easily and make friends. This will give them a sense of belonging, which will help their performance on a whole. The only social skills scheme that Sainsbury's offers is The Sainsbury's Staff Association (SSA). They provide social outgoings for colleagues and their families. This association also negotiates discounts for colleagues for insurance, motoring costs and banking. However only 89,000 out of the 150,968 Sainsbury's employs are members of the SSA. This is because most of the employees do not know about these organisations and it usually gets around by word of mouth. This evidence I have obtained by doing field research. Employees are not offered pay on their performance but just the minimum wage. However middle and senior management have a bonus scheme when they will get paid bonuses in terms of sales, customer and colleague satisfaction and targets that are set at the beginning of each year. Employees are not offered this bonus, which mean that their 'esteem needs' will not be fulfilled. Sainsbury's does not offer much in terms of this stage in Maslow's hierarchy. It concentrates on the immediate needs of the employee needs more than the esteem needs. ...read more.

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Response to the question

In summary, the report is quite basic. The report states background information regrading Sainsbury's and states a clear plan on how the student will find out about motiving staff members. However the report does contain a number of inaccurate information ...

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Response to the question

In summary, the report is quite basic. The report states background information regrading Sainsbury's and states a clear plan on how the student will find out about motiving staff members. However the report does contain a number of inaccurate information and parts which do not make any sense. The student has made an effort, although the report is often wrong and incorrect. The report states that Sainsbury's is a Private Limited Company, however this is false. Sainsbury's is a PLC (Public Limited Company), whereby any person/organisation is able to purchase shares on the London Stock Exchange. This shows the examiner poor understanding of Sainsbury's current position as a business. The student sets out a clear plan on how their will conduct their research. This is clear and this section will award them with high marks. The student states the following '64% are women, 10% are store managers and 13% are ethnic minorities'. I don't understand? What are these numbers for, why would a student state the % of women and combine this with ethnic minorities. Some ethnic minorities may be women, and the numbers don't really make any sense. Personally, this doesn't make any sense and it's quite strange that a student states three prices of data which are quite irrelevant.

Level of analysis

The student acknowledges that employees need to be motived to allow an high output per employee. However the student hasn't stated what this creates. The report could include 'By maximizing the output per employee, this would allow the business to reduce the need to employ a large number of employees, and this would reduce cost. Thus, their profits will increase due to the additional output per employee'. The section 'Background Knowledge' is too vague and doesn't really explain how mangers may motive their employees. The report states how money is an important factor, which is is. The report also states that this is not only the primary factor. Although the student doesn't state any methods of how employees use to motive their staff, which is what needs to be written when discussing their background understanding of motivating employees.

Quality of writing

The report is split into different sub-headings, although the text is within blocks of text and this makes it quite difficult to read. The student should make the paragraphs clear, to allow the exmainer to read the report with ease.


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