• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analyzing Creons Speech

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Analyzing Creons Speech Ruler of Thebes in the middle of a war, Creon wants order and loyalty above all else. He cannot bear to be defied, any more than he can bear to watch the laws of the state defied. He has Polyneice's body defiled while Eteocles is honored because he feels that he cannot give equal to share to both brothers when one was a traitor and the other was loyal. He does not recognize that other forms of justice exist, and in his pride he sentences Antigone to death, defies the gods, and brings ruin on himself. ...read more.

Middle

Creon differentiates his boy, prince, to any other boy in Thebes. "A father whose sons yield no such profits", is contrasting with Haemon which will be prepared to fight Creons enemies. Creon quickly and discreetly changed the topic on the present events which is Antigone. He tells his son to get rid of her, "split her out like poison". His misogynistic advice is for Haemon not to marry her and let her die for her actions against him and the state. This is an explanation to his view and action of the situation. In his speech there are a lot of repetition involving loyalty and untrustworthy. ...read more.

Conclusion

Its to good to be true, I think if he is trying to refer to the death of Antigone to the matter, and personally thinking that setting this kind of example will help regain his authority and pride, I think he is making a big mistake because he will only scare the chorus and make them sycophant, which they already are. He tells the people to listen to him and everything will improve, he makes it look like he will make miracles like gods, therefore increasing his power and capabilities. In those days it was regarded as disloyal to the gods, I think this is ironic because the whole point of Creons speech is about loyalty, and for leaving Polyneice's body left to rote, which is disloyal, contradicting himself without realizing it. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Classics essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Greek Gods and Mythology

    He is also known as the rich one. He is also very violent. Hades does not allow anyone to leave the underworld. He enjoys the mortalâs sigh and tears. He rules the underworld with his helper, Thanatos, âDeath.â The three-headed dog, Cerberus, who attacks everyone except sprints, guards the gate of the underworld.

  2. Euthanasia Speech

    Some would say this was assisted suicide, not euthanasia because he was not dying but I think that anyone who is suffering severely has the right to chose an early death . Who's choice is it anyway? Everyone has the right to die with dignity, pain free and with their senses intact.

  1. The Historical Influence on the Differences in Creon's Leadership in Sophocles' and Anouilh's Antigone.

    Sophocles inserts this explicitly in Creon's character who sees Antigone's gender as a threat: ...never let some woman triumph over us.6 Anarchy- ...She, she destroys cities, rips up houses...7 Personification of anarchy as being female is used to emphasize Antigone's sex as inferior to man.

  2. Medea - Euripides lived during the Golden Age of Athens, the city where he ...

    The chorus lauds Jason's reasoning, but still finds that he remains unjustified in divorcing Medea. Medea believes that all Jason's arguments stem from a need to rationalize a decision that he intuitively recognizes as wrong. He is unequivocally corrupt, yet successfully hides behind a mask of rhetorical eloquence.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work