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Citizenship coursework B OCR Nationals

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Introduction

Should 16-year olds, have the right to vote in a General Election? I have looked at two articles to help answer this question. The first one is: "Old enough to fight - old enough to vote?" extract adapted from the BBC Gloucestershire Website, 19 May 2004, www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire The second one is "They're making a song and dance about voting at 16" adapted from the Times Online 13 April 2004 http://www.timesonline.co.uk/, by David Denver To make the answer more successful, I have also done some other research. The third one is "Brown backs votes at 16 in radical shakeup of politics" from The Guardian, Monday 27th February 2006. This subject regarding Votes at 16 is a controversial matter. Although people have their own opinion and speak about it very often, the facts are unexplained. This subject has already caused problems and discussions too among the Britains. To get a clear understanding about these articles I will first mention about the target audiences; the first one is aimed at people who have just hit 16, because it starts off by saying, "so you've hit 16" and the second is aimed at sophisticated people who reads the Timesonline (educated people, being more precise) ...read more.

Middle

It keeps the reader wondering as to what the article is about unlike the first article. It creates defamiliarisation. It is also very different from the first as it does not use other people's opinions through their own voice. So what does this article say about the voting age? Descriptive words and imagery are used to emphasize the message. For an example where it says, "website includes a picture of a bride whose wedding day appears to have been ruined because..." shows how some people are already affected although it is a rare thing. It also creates sympathy in the readers' minds where it says that it had "ruined". It gives the reader a - sorry feeling - impression and positions him in the centre where he will find it hard to be for or agains reducing the voting age. The flow of information is logicall; it goes on from mentioning about rights to the explanation of why different righs must be granted at different ages. So the reader would definitely see a pattern forming. This article has got rhetorical questions and two of them are against reducing the voting age. ...read more.

Conclusion

An example of bias can be also found in the statement where it says: "a new Britain is in the process of being born". It is biased for reducing the vote age and this is a strong statement as it is said by an important person. This article ends in a questioning note. Despite whatever we believe, as a society we cannot escape the different aspects of multicurturalism when it comes to this problem or any other situation where opinion matter. Teenagers need to be taught about rights and the influenze of getting different peoples opinions (through vote). First of the two articles are persuasive and does not fully give both sides of the argument. Eventhough all of them are different in styles: first two articles aim to persuade the reader and the next one to provide the reader with information to come up with their own answer. First article depending on opinions, second on facts employ sympathy at some places. The third article is highly factual and does not force the reader in anyway. There is no wonder the society is confused over the debate on "voting age" as neither of the articles presents clear viewpoints and none of them cannot be seen as entirely true. So... how can the society form a clear view when different persuasive sources present different ideas? ...read more.

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