• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Citizenship coursework B OCR Nationals

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Should 16-year olds, have the right to vote in a General Election? I have looked at two articles to help answer this question. The first one is: "Old enough to fight - old enough to vote?" extract adapted from the BBC Gloucestershire Website, 19 May 2004, www.bbc.co.uk/gloucestershire The second one is "They're making a song and dance about voting at 16" adapted from the Times Online 13 April 2004 http://www.timesonline.co.uk/, by David Denver To make the answer more successful, I have also done some other research. The third one is "Brown backs votes at 16 in radical shakeup of politics" from The Guardian, Monday 27th February 2006. This subject regarding Votes at 16 is a controversial matter. Although people have their own opinion and speak about it very often, the facts are unexplained. This subject has already caused problems and discussions too among the Britains. To get a clear understanding about these articles I will first mention about the target audiences; the first one is aimed at people who have just hit 16, because it starts off by saying, "so you've hit 16" and the second is aimed at sophisticated people who reads the Timesonline (educated people, being more precise) ...read more.

Middle

It keeps the reader wondering as to what the article is about unlike the first article. It creates defamiliarisation. It is also very different from the first as it does not use other people's opinions through their own voice. So what does this article say about the voting age? Descriptive words and imagery are used to emphasize the message. For an example where it says, "website includes a picture of a bride whose wedding day appears to have been ruined because..." shows how some people are already affected although it is a rare thing. It also creates sympathy in the readers' minds where it says that it had "ruined". It gives the reader a - sorry feeling - impression and positions him in the centre where he will find it hard to be for or agains reducing the voting age. The flow of information is logicall; it goes on from mentioning about rights to the explanation of why different righs must be granted at different ages. So the reader would definitely see a pattern forming. This article has got rhetorical questions and two of them are against reducing the voting age. ...read more.

Conclusion

An example of bias can be also found in the statement where it says: "a new Britain is in the process of being born". It is biased for reducing the vote age and this is a strong statement as it is said by an important person. This article ends in a questioning note. Despite whatever we believe, as a society we cannot escape the different aspects of multicurturalism when it comes to this problem or any other situation where opinion matter. Teenagers need to be taught about rights and the influenze of getting different peoples opinions (through vote). First of the two articles are persuasive and does not fully give both sides of the argument. Eventhough all of them are different in styles: first two articles aim to persuade the reader and the next one to provide the reader with information to come up with their own answer. First article depending on opinions, second on facts employ sympathy at some places. The third article is highly factual and does not force the reader in anyway. There is no wonder the society is confused over the debate on "voting age" as neither of the articles presents clear viewpoints and none of them cannot be seen as entirely true. So... how can the society form a clear view when different persuasive sources present different ideas? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Classics essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    How well do you think Ovid engages the reader in the telling of Scylla ...

    4 star(s)

    Also the fact that she is banished from her own city and Minos is evidently not sweeping her off her feet to comply with her dreams, means that Scylla is undoubtedly stuck and cannot go anywhere. Moreover Scylla realises after she has been banished that did wrong and should not

  2. child development coursework visit 1

    As this was a physical activity I realised that we should take a rest and maybe it was an appropriate time to bring the food activity. I brought the fruit that I had cut and washed earlier and sat down on the table Harris sat at the table with no

  1. Kafka's View of Society in The Metamorphosis

    Gregor is penalized for his efforts to be a good son, and a good worker; his toils are completely taken for granted by both family and employer. Gregor is completely isolated by his job; he has no friends, and no chance to make friends.

  2. Medea - Euripides lived during the Golden Age of Athens, the city where he ...

    Pointing out that the grudge she bears is directed against Jason, rather than Creon and his daughter, Medea pleads with the king to allow her to remain in Corinth, where she will endure her sufferings without protest. Creon is distrustful and unyielding, but ultimately agrees to provide Medea with one

  1. Who made the greatest contribution to the Athenian Constitution?

    league to use Athenian law and make their commercial and business transactions through the Athenian courts. Having heard the speeches from the four Shades, Zeus and Athena continue arguing about which Athenian contributed the most to the constitution. Athena then rises and uses her powers of wisdom to analyse the

  2. Latin Coursework Roman Culture

    written promise; to impart to my sons and the sons of the master who taught me and the disciples who have enrolled themselves and have agreed to the rules of the profession, but to these alone the precepts and the instruction.

  1. Multiple choice questions from The Crucible.

    Midieval B. Elizabethan C. Renaissance D. Greek E. Neoclassical 11. The House Unamerican Activities Committee looked for ____________. A. witches B. tax evaders C. terrorists D. lotto winners E. Communists 12 All of the following are major themes from The Crucible except_________. A. Intolerance B. Community C. Hysteria D.

  2. Was Britain Worth The Romans Invading?

    In the BC 54 invasion, Julius Caesar kept peace with the local tribes of Britain by asking for tributes and hostages in return for peace. There was no more land gained in this second expedition, but it did mean that Rome now had some trading partners on the island, which gave Rome access to more materials and goods.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work