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Despite their differences in character, Antigone and Miss Julie encounter the same fate.

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Introduction

Despite their differences in character, Antigone and Miss Julie encounter the same fate. Miss Julie set in the late 19th century, originally written by August Strindberg, is a tragic play, originally written in Swedish, and later translated by Helen Cooper in 1992. It is a naturalistic tragedy set in Midsummer Eve in the 1880s. Miss Julie (1888) is considered Strindberg's most famous work. It is acknowledged for its stylistic innovations and is a depiction of the play's twenty-five-year-old tragic heroine; doomed to a cruel demise. Antigone, conversely, an adaptation of Sophocles's play, revolves around the plays heroine, Antigone and her conflict with her uncle, Creon. Later translated by Jean Anouilh, the play is considered one of his most often produced works till date. Although both plays end with the death of the leading character, the circumstances by which they occur are very diverse. It is essential to observe the lives of the playwrights and see to what extent their own thoughts, beliefs and feelings are reflected in writing. This is predominant in the case of Strindberg, in particular the rise of his misogynist attitudes and his mental health condition. Strindberg believed that women were an inferior form, which can be seen through reading his preface to the play where he states: "She (Miss Julie) ...read more.

Middle

After swearing his loyalty, Antigone sends him away saying she will never become his wife, as she knows that she is to die under Creon's predicament. However, Haemon stays with Antigone till she dies proceeding to take his own life to stay with his beloved in a last embrace. This shows the contrast between the two characters where one, Julie, ill-treats men as if they were animals compared to Antigone who surrenders her love in order to abide to her faith and family duties. Jean, a servant in that society, aspires to belong to the same aristocracy Julie belongs to, thus arises an interest in her. The pair is shown to tell of a dream they have, which seems to be almost prophetic. Julie's dream is that she is on top of a high pillar unable to get down but longing to touch the ground, almost afraid to see what may come ahead if she is unable to do so. She says if she did reach the ground, she would "want to sink lower, lower."5 Jean in contrast dreams of lying under a tree and longing to be on the tree instead, high up enabling him to see the horizon. The only thing standing between that from happening is the branch, which appears to be too high to reach out to, but he says, "I know if I can only reach it... ...read more.

Conclusion

Antigone never regretted her decision of proceeding with the burial and never once did she vaguely think of submission or an apology in order to flee death. Accordingly, Antigone died as a solitary martyr and attained a tragic stature by undertaking her revered sense of duty. Perceptive, idealistic, self-righteous Antigone refused to compromise. Despite their differences in character, one being a woman from aristocracy, scarred by her upbringing and caught in a whirlwind of one's status in society, another, a headstrong sister, who rebelled against her uncle in order to ensue her duties to her family, they both encountered the same destiny, a doomed demise, death. 1 Miss Julie, August Strindberg, translated by Helen Cooper, published by Methuen Drama. 2 Miss Julie, August Strindberg, translated by Helen Cooper, published by Methuen Drama. 3 Miss Julie, August Strindberg, translated by Helen Cooper, published by Methuen Drama. 4 Miss Julie, August Strindberg, translated by Helen Cooper, published by Methuen Drama. 5 Miss Julie, August Strindberg, translated by Helen Cooper, published by Methuen Drama. 6 Miss Julie, August Strindberg, translated by Helen Cooper, published by Methuen Drama. 7 Miss Julie, August Strindberg, translated by Helen Cooper, published by Methuen Drama. 8 Antigone, Jean Anouilh, translated by Lewis Galantiere, published by Methuen co. and Ltd. 9 Antigone, Jean Anouilh, translated by Lewis Galantiere, published by Methuen co. and Ltd. 10 Antigone, Jean Anouilh, translated by Lewis Galantiere, published by Methuen co. and Ltd. ...read more.

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