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Divine intervention in the Odyssey.

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Introduction

Divine intervention in the Odyssey Divine intervention is when the gods interfere with the theme, plot or story line in some way. Poseidon: Poseidon intervenes after Odysseus and company visits the Cyclops, Polyphemus, Poseidon's son, and blinds him. At the end of this part in the story, Odysseus tells Polyphemus his name, and Polyphemus gets Poseidon to take revenge. Poseidon does this by creating a tremendous storm, when Odysseus leaves the island of Ogygia, being released from Calypso, almost killing him; Odysseus finally landing at Scherie, where the Phaeacians live. Poseidon doing this intervenes with Odysseus' long journey home, prolonging it even more. It happens to Odysseus just after he has been held hostage by calypso for seven years. ...read more.

Middle

This makes Odysseus seem like a stronger character, being looked out for by a Goddess, and makes him seem like an unbeatable hero. The first time she interferes with the plot is in the council meeting of the Gods, and she persuades them to make Calypso let Odysseus go. She then puts spirit into telemachus, Odysseus' son, and advices him, disguised as an old friend of Odysseus', to confront the suitors publicly and then, if they still stay, to go and find out information about the whereabouts of his father. She then intervenes by proposing a route to take to see Nestor and Menelaus, and accompanies him disguised as Mentor. The next time she interferes is when she arranges for Nausicaa to rescue Odysseus when he comes ashore. ...read more.

Conclusion

All the intervention that Athene does in this book is so that she can help Odysseus as much as she can, because she likes him. Aeolus - wind-god: He intervenes in the story when he gave Odysseus all the winds in a bag so that they wouldn't stop him from reaching Ithaca. His crew members were too curious though, because they thought that it might be treasure or something, so opened the bag and let all the bad winds out, and they were blown back to Aeolus' island. Zeus: As well as intervening at the end of the book, he also intervened to take revenge for the sun-god. Odysseus' crew, who had been specifically told not to kill the sun-gods cattle, killed them anyway, and Zeus avenged this by sending them a storm, destroying the last ship and all of Odysseus' crew, leaving just Odysseus who was swept away to Ogygia. ...read more.

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