• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Fate in Medea

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Observation and Interpretation: Throughout the text, fate and the gods are blamed for the cause of the problems, however subsequent choices made later on by the characters appear to be free will, however are actually influenced by fate and the gods. So what?: This makes the audience blame the gods for the overall out come, but still blame the main character for her choices. Quotes: P48 l. 1014-1015 "The gods/ And my evil-hearted plots have led to this." P39 l. 717 "What good luck chance has brought you." P61 l. 1416-1419 "Many matters the gods bring to surprising ends./ The things we thought would happen do not happen;/ The unexpected God makes possible;/ And such is the conclusion of this story." To an ancient Greek, fate was thought of as the power that determined all of our destinies, although a person could make choices along their life to change small outcomes, which was the extent of free will. ...read more.

Middle

Medea also explicitly blames the gods of the outcome of the play, since her evil-hearted plans stem from her love for Jason. However, the choices made in her throughout the book, appear to be free will. The most prominent section of the play that is associated with free will is when Medea makes the choice to murder her children. At this part, Medea is torn between the decision to kill her children or take them away with her. The mere presence of her indecision shows that it is free will which will determine the outcome. Her original plan was to kill the children, yet at one point she says, "Why should I hurt them...Myself? I won't do it." (1044,1046) However at the end she responds to herself with, "The thing's done now." which affirms that the children's fates are sealed. (1062) Her circumlocution shows that despite her efforts to consider an alternative, she still arrives at the same ending; killing her children. ...read more.

Conclusion

One of the more obvious parts of the play that can be seen as more fate, than free will, is Aegeus's arrival in Corinth. On the free will side, Aegeus did not have to come to Corinth seeking help about the oracle. However, if the oracle was not so confusing, Aegeus would not have needed to come to Corinth, leaving Medea with nowhere to go. Medea supports this by saying, "What good luck chance has brought you." (717) The "chance" that Medea is talking about is the oracle itself, and the situation around it. Therefore fate, in this case, is more prominent than the free will. Fate, it appears to be lurking behind every choice, every action, and every event that takes place in the play. For the audience, this makes them blame the gods for the overall outcome of the play, however the audience still sees the individual choices made by the character, to be the fault of the character. Although, through much thinking, the audience will start to see the fate behind the actions, therefore the whole play is just fate. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Classics essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Greek Gods and Mythology

    He killed his father and took over. Every time a child was born of him, he swallowed it, until he was tricked by his wife and swallowed a stone instead of the child. She hid the child from him and it grew up to overthrow him (Kronus, Internet).

  2. Science case study

    Heart disease and COPD follow with about 20% of deaths each. Other tobacco-related disease including stroke also take up about 18.3% deaths each. Also, 0.7% of tobacco-related deaths are a result of passive smoking. - What does smoking do to the lungs?

  1. "Do you think that Euripides intended us to sympathise with Medea?"

    fact that she cares, because to us, she does not care enough, and we don't like her for it. When the messenger describes the awful death of Creon and his daughter in great detail we again feel absolutely no sympathy for Medea.

  2. 'Aeneas Is Little More Than A Puppet Controlled By The Whims Of The Gods' ...

    into the Underworld in order to once again see Anchises, his father. Aeneas pietas is clearly shown when he carries his father Anchises out of Troy on his back, dragging his son Ascanius by his hand with his wife following behind him.

  1. Medea. Throughout the play Medea experiences many agon within herself and with other characters. ...

    On page 55 it becomes clear that, from her actions, her children will most likely be killed anyway and she states; "they must die... and since they must, then I who gave them birth will kill them." (Euripides, 431 BC, p 55).

  2. Medea - Euripides lived during the Golden Age of Athens, the city where he ...

    The chorus continues by rehashing the tale of Medea's misfortune, "an exile with no redress" (439). Commentary Medea's first public pronouncement, a sort of "protest speech," provides one of the highlights of the play and demonstrates some of its complex, at times even contradictory, representations of gender.

  1. "Jason is detestable - and uncomfortably like us. By contrast Medea, except that she ...

    Her first appearance is one of upset and understandable anger, as the unfaithful Jason has betrayed her. She displays signs of being utterly lost, even suicidal, without him. "Oh, oh! What misery, what wretchedness! What shall I do? If only I were dead!"

  2. Gladiatorial games and what made them so exciting

    popular because there is such a wide range of gladiators who each fight in there own way which is one reason for it being so exciting. Different types of gladiators and their armour This is a gladiator scene from the zilten mosaic.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work