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Multiple choice questions from The Crucible.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

1. _______________________was the wife of xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, who, from all accounts, was one of those men for whom both sides of the argument had to have respect. He was called upon to arbitrate disputes as though he were an unofficial judge, and _________________also enjoyed the high opinion most people had for him. A. Danforth, B. Abigail, C. Elizabeth Proctor D. Rebecca Nurse E. Ann Putnam 2. _________________was a farmer in his middle thirties. He need not have bee a partisan of any faction in the town, but there is evidence to suggest that he had a sharp and biting way with hypocrites. He was the kind of man-powerful of body, even-tempered, and not easily led-who cannot refuse to support partisans without drawing their deepest resentment. A. Giles Corey B. John Proctor C. Francis Nurse D. Thomas Putnam E. Cheever 3. A word about _________________. He was a man with many grievances, at least one of which appears justified. Some time before, his wife's brother-in-law, James Bayley had been turned down as minister at Salem. Bayley had all the qualifications, and a two-thirds vote into the bargain, but a faction stopped his acceptance, for reasons that are unclear. _________________was the eldest son of the richest man in the village. A. Thomas Putnam B. Hale C. Danforth D. John Proctor E. Giles Corey 4. _________________is nearing forty, a tight-skinned, eager-eyed intellectual. This is a beloved errand for him; on being called here to ascertain witchcraft he felt the pride of the specialist whose unique knowledge has at last been publicly called for. A. Hathorne B. Danforth C. Cheever D. Herrick E. Hale 5. Old __________must be spoken for, if only because his fate was to be so remarkable and so different from that of all the others. He was in his early eighties at this time, and was the most comical hero in the history. No man has ever been blamed for so much. ...read more.

Middle

Are you able to make a link between any of these issues and the need for social responsibility as expressed by Miller. 2. Societal Problems Can Often Be Traced To Individual Human Failings. Though the trial has religious and super-natural implications Miller tends to show the troubles as stemming from recognisable human failings. Discuss how the following failings are manifested in the play - greed, vengeance, jealousy, ambition, fear, hysteria. Refer back to the grid you completed at the beginning of this unit in which you listed contemporary examples of the issues raised in The Crucible. Are you able to make a link between any of these issues and Miller's contention that social problems can often be traced back to individual failings? 3. Societies Often Try To Suppress Individual Freedom, In Order To Maintain Social Order. Discuss how this idea is brought out in the play especially through Proctor's struggle in the final act - the judges' insistence on pinning his written confession on the church door and his resistance to this. Also through Giles Corey who tries to maintain his individual rights (but note the contrast with Proctor's motives). Refer back to the grid you completed at the beginning of this unit in which you listed contemporary examples of the issues raised in The Crucible. Are you able to make a link between any of these issues and the ideas about individual freedom contained in The Crucible? 4. Often People Tend to Think in 'Black and White'. (eg. good or evil, god-like or devilish, capitalist or communist). The upholders of the social order like Danforth are forced into this sort of thinking. How? Even Elizabeth Proctor associates John's sexual transgression with evil but what does she come to see. Refer back to the grid you completed at the beginning of this unit in which you listed contemporary examples of the issues raised in The Crucible. ...read more.

Conclusion

Dancing was strictly forbidden in the Puritan society seen as unholy. Betty's illness brings Reverend Hale to Salem to check for signs of witchcraft Hale is a man revered for his work with the banishing of witches. Marry Warren is the current maid of the Proctors. She and Abigail was amongst the girls caught in the woods. Mary in the beginnings is one of the many who are making accusations but once she sees what harm is being done to kind people she knows like Elizabeth Proctor she has a change of heart and tries to right not only her wrongs but the wrongs of the other girls Tituba is the slave of Mr. Paris. Tituba has been accused of conjuring up spirits with the girls in the woods. Tituba is accused of being a witch and in order to save herself she has to admit to their actually being witches in the community. This act begins the witch hunt. Elizabeth Proctor is the wife of John Proctor. Elizabeth's non-affectionate demeanor towards her very affectionate husband, forces him to look for it else where in the arms of Abigail. When realizing the error of his ways John discontinues the relationship and tries to rebuild his relationship with his wife. This act sparks tension between Abigail and Elizabeth, marking Elizabeth as Abigail's main target in her witch hunt. Elizabeth's love, loyalty and devotion to her husband Judge Hathorne is the Judge who has come to Salem to preside over the cases. Judge Hathone is depicted as a man who is not easily persuade. He needs absolute proof and if it is not granted then you are therefore guilty. Hathorne claims to be fulfilling God's duty by banishing the tainted spirits but he himself seems to be acting as God. Reverend Hale is the revered Reverend who has come to Salem to conduct the witch hunt. Reverend Hale's presence in the community sparks a massive outbreak of people being accused. Once Reverend Hale realizes the corruption which is taking place he tries desperately to spare the lives of these innocent people and expose the liars. ...read more.

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