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Religious concerns in Antigone.

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Introduction

Religious concerns in Antigone Life was full of intricate questions in Ancient Greece, these questions mostly concerning the growing ground of science. Autonomy of religion was greatly encouraged and was to be put into effect in the city-states. People were very much focused on a lot more than the Gods or holy concerns. Consequently countless new ideals and beliefs were becoming much clearer, these fresh ideals and beliefs, despite good in meaning, often clashed with each other and shaped multifaceted moral quandaries. This was the case in Sophocles's play 'Antigone', in the play, Antigone and Creon encounter a theoretical war regarding their conflicting ideals. The disagreement arose when ideals that they personally use to back up their behaviours on the interment of Polyneices clashed, generating a challenge between morals. ...read more.

Middle

An important model in Ancient Greece was the faith that the government was to have absolutely no control what so ever in subjects with reference to any person's religious philosophies. From Antigone's point of view, Creon was extremely disloyal to that principle by not allowing her to bury her brother, Polyneices in the way that she felt it should be. Believing that Creon did not have the supremacy to deny Polyneices Antigone fought for that right so that the burial was a religious ceremony. But unfortunately Antigone's well-built beliefs ultimately led her to death by the hand of Creon, whose actions are directed by the principle that man is the gauge of all things. He deems that the good of a man comes prior to the Gods. ...read more.

Conclusion

The second ideal confronted was the ideal of freedom of religion. By Creon denying Antigone her right to carry out burial ceremonies for her brother Polyneices, he is denying Antigone the ideal supporting the right for freedom of religion. The oppositions flanked by the philosophies of Antigone and Creon are extremely strong and significant right the way through the play. None of their confrontations rule over the other one, even though they are both right and wrong at the same time in many different ways. Antigone is clearly following the divine law whereas Creon is trying to defend the truthfulness of the city-state. Eventually, Creon was persuaded to set Antigone free after he debated the ideals and weighed the factors. But by this time it deemed that it was too late. The challenging of ideals was the grounds of the deaths of Antigone, Haemon, and Megareus. Equally both sides were reasoned and all beliefs were supported. ...read more.

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