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Romeo and Juliet Scence 5

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare's presentation of the 'star crossed lovers' in Act 1 Scene 5 prepare the audience for the inevitable tragedy? By Ljaureta Krasniqi William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet is the most influential romantic tragedy plays of all times. The play which was written in the Elizabethan times in 1554 appealed to the Elizabethan audience via the play's tragedy. Elizabethan audiences enjoyed this play partly because of the dramatic irony used where the audience knows more than the characters do, but also because they admired tragedies. The prologue is used at the beginning to summarise what the play is about the prologue mentions 'two star crossed lovers' who attempt to overcome the conflict between each others families despite them being at odds with one another for decades, dramatic irony is created when the audience learn of the 'death marked love'. Act 1 Scene 5 prepare the audience for the inevitable tragedy as this is the first time Romeo and Juliet meet. The play shows the audience an insight of what is going to occur through the prologue, this creates suspense and tension as audience members can not wait to see what they have learnt in action. Two powerful families the Montagues and the Capulets, have been feuding with each other for years. We learn about Romeo's fight with fellow family members of the Capulet's in previous scenes. ...read more.

Middle

The masked ball itself is an extremely important event in the play as it is where the "two star crossed lovers" (Romeo and Juliet) meet and first experience one another's love. Romeo's first line when entering the ball is dramatic, "what lady's that which doth enrich the hand of the yonder knight" here Shakespeare inserts the technique of dramatic irony as the audience have already learnt from the prologue that they are both the children of their eternal enemies. The pair is destined to be with one another as told in the prologue "star crossed lovers" and at the ball they fulfil this destiny when they meet and fall in love with each other, Juliet so much so that she even declares that "if he be married, my grave is likely to be my wedding bed." Romeo expresses his love for Juliet with powerful religious metaphors and imagery that creates a passionate and dramatic atmosphere in this scene. "I profane with my unwothiest hand this holy shrine." "Thus from my lips, by yours my sin is purged". This is strong and very religious metaphors that Romeo uses this suggests that he is unholy but hopes to cleanse him self with her pure and holy touch. Although it is a clever lure to steal a kiss, Juliet does not resist it "then have my lips" therefore it is clear she shares his feelings of love. ...read more.

Conclusion

Act 1 scene 5 is also the turning point of the play as it is where Romeo learns that Juliet is a Capulet, after learning of this, their long and arduous journey to overcome the feud with one another's families has only just begun. Furthermore in this scene Juliet's threatens to take her own life "if he be married, my grave is likely to be my wedding bed" also Romeo's premonition hints towards his death tie within the tragic ending where both lovers take their lives. As predicted. "A pair of star crossed lovers take their life." In conclusion I have analysed various aspects of Act 1 Scene 5 and have tried to explain as much as possible about the drama and fatal meetings between Romeo and Juliet. I have explored how dramatic irony kicks in and how it shows the audience the great devotion between the two lovers. With dramatic irony it allows us to see further into the play before any character can. Tybalt's intense hatred for Romeo is expressed thornily as well as foreshadowing of the couple's fate in all ways in which the scene is made daringly dramatic. These points all fit in together with the rest of the play. Furthermore, the essay is examined how the appearance of Act 1 scene 5 is dramatised. The play talks about fate throughout, how fate effects people as it is written however I disagree as fate is only what you choose to make of it. Ljaureta Krasniqi ?? ?? ?? ?? By Ljaureta Krasniqi ...read more.

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