• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Romeo and Juliet Scence 5

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Shakespeare's presentation of the 'star crossed lovers' in Act 1 Scene 5 prepare the audience for the inevitable tragedy? By Ljaureta Krasniqi William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet is the most influential romantic tragedy plays of all times. The play which was written in the Elizabethan times in 1554 appealed to the Elizabethan audience via the play's tragedy. Elizabethan audiences enjoyed this play partly because of the dramatic irony used where the audience knows more than the characters do, but also because they admired tragedies. The prologue is used at the beginning to summarise what the play is about the prologue mentions 'two star crossed lovers' who attempt to overcome the conflict between each others families despite them being at odds with one another for decades, dramatic irony is created when the audience learn of the 'death marked love'. Act 1 Scene 5 prepare the audience for the inevitable tragedy as this is the first time Romeo and Juliet meet. The play shows the audience an insight of what is going to occur through the prologue, this creates suspense and tension as audience members can not wait to see what they have learnt in action. Two powerful families the Montagues and the Capulets, have been feuding with each other for years. We learn about Romeo's fight with fellow family members of the Capulet's in previous scenes. ...read more.

Middle

The masked ball itself is an extremely important event in the play as it is where the "two star crossed lovers" (Romeo and Juliet) meet and first experience one another's love. Romeo's first line when entering the ball is dramatic, "what lady's that which doth enrich the hand of the yonder knight" here Shakespeare inserts the technique of dramatic irony as the audience have already learnt from the prologue that they are both the children of their eternal enemies. The pair is destined to be with one another as told in the prologue "star crossed lovers" and at the ball they fulfil this destiny when they meet and fall in love with each other, Juliet so much so that she even declares that "if he be married, my grave is likely to be my wedding bed." Romeo expresses his love for Juliet with powerful religious metaphors and imagery that creates a passionate and dramatic atmosphere in this scene. "I profane with my unwothiest hand this holy shrine." "Thus from my lips, by yours my sin is purged". This is strong and very religious metaphors that Romeo uses this suggests that he is unholy but hopes to cleanse him self with her pure and holy touch. Although it is a clever lure to steal a kiss, Juliet does not resist it "then have my lips" therefore it is clear she shares his feelings of love. ...read more.

Conclusion

Act 1 scene 5 is also the turning point of the play as it is where Romeo learns that Juliet is a Capulet, after learning of this, their long and arduous journey to overcome the feud with one another's families has only just begun. Furthermore in this scene Juliet's threatens to take her own life "if he be married, my grave is likely to be my wedding bed" also Romeo's premonition hints towards his death tie within the tragic ending where both lovers take their lives. As predicted. "A pair of star crossed lovers take their life." In conclusion I have analysed various aspects of Act 1 Scene 5 and have tried to explain as much as possible about the drama and fatal meetings between Romeo and Juliet. I have explored how dramatic irony kicks in and how it shows the audience the great devotion between the two lovers. With dramatic irony it allows us to see further into the play before any character can. Tybalt's intense hatred for Romeo is expressed thornily as well as foreshadowing of the couple's fate in all ways in which the scene is made daringly dramatic. These points all fit in together with the rest of the play. Furthermore, the essay is examined how the appearance of Act 1 scene 5 is dramatised. The play talks about fate throughout, how fate effects people as it is written however I disagree as fate is only what you choose to make of it. Ljaureta Krasniqi ?? ?? ?? ?? By Ljaureta Krasniqi ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Classics essays

  1. A high proportion of the most dramatic scenes in the plays of all ages ...

    of defying him, almost wanting her to lie and deny the truth of her actions yet he instinctually knows she disobeyed him without needing to ask. Antigone answers simply yes to his question, unashamed of her actions - the threat of death not seeming to phase her.

  2. A high proportion of the most dramatic scenes in plays from all eras are ...

    between the two characters and the different principles they represented, and the image of the 'thin little creature' standing up to the authoritative, powerful King. This is further stressed by the fact that they are the only two people on stage, which is highly dramatic.

  1. Medea - Euripides lived during the Golden Age of Athens, the city where he ...

    She then tells of her plans to flee to Athens with Aegeus, and finishes by divining an "unheroic death" (line 1388) for Jason, who will perish by being hit over the head with a log from his famous ship, the Argo.

  2. Throughout the play 'Antigone' there is a constant emphasis on the use and abuse ...

    he states that he must find the killer of Laius (ironically himself) in case "he might think to turn his hand against me". When Creon finds that the 'criminal' is his niece, a woman, he cannot process it at first. He questions her and clearly expects her to deny it.

  1. Sophocles - The Theban Plays.

    She believed that the burial was a religious ceremony, that the 'order did not come from God' and Creon did not have the authority or power to deny Polynices that right. Antigone's strong beliefs eventually lead to her death by the hand of Creon: 'Justice, that dwells with the gods below, knows no such law.

  2. “Analyse Anouilh’s use of variety dramatic devices in his presentation of Antigone in the ...

    The nurse doesn't seem to register Antigone's daydream, continuing to scold her for leaving her room in the middle of the night. Then, when the nurse starts to quiz Antigone about where she has been and what she has been doing that morning, Antigone can only answer with idyllic responses

  1. Who made the greatest contribution to the Athenian Constitution?

    Solon's reform created an export tariff, which, in the 21st Century, no country in their right mind would want. Yes, it did prevent the people starving, but as an economic reform, it didn't really benefit the present economy and would not benefit that of the future.

  2. To Kill A Mockingbird Essay

    When cursed and spat at by Bob Ewell there was only one thing that he had to say, "I wish that Bob Ewell wouldn't chew tobacco," (Lee: 239). The reader is positioned to see Atticus as a sort of 'moral father' to the story, angered as he suffers through the

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work