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What do you think Roman of Virgil's day would have found to admire or criticise in Aeneas's behaviour/actions on the last nigh

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Introduction

What do you think Roman of Virgil's day would have found to admire or criticise in Aeneas's behaviour/actions on the last night of Troy In Book two of the Aeneid we are told the story of how Troy was destroyed by the Greek army, this story is told in the words of Aeneas. Before the destruction of troy had even begun we are able to find a major fault in the actions of Aeneas. When the Trojans first found the supposed gift to Athena on the beach they were confused. Looking at the horse some believed it was a sacred gift left by the Greeks in honour of Athena. But some doubted this and said it was a trap and it should be destroyed. One of the people who thought this was Laocoon, the priest of Neptune. Practically telling the Trojans the fate of the horse and throwing a spear into the horse's side where it quivered. The Romans wound criticise Aeneas for turning a blind eye to this information and not bothering to check the horse out for himself. When reeling the great horse into the walls of troy the Trojans did not take account of the other signs that something was wrong. ...read more.

Middle

This is foolish of Aeneas, as this will not help his city at all. All this would do is loose all of Troy best fighter and leave the people weak and defenceless with no one to lead them to safety or reassure them. Aeneas and his men come up with a crafty plan, thinking that if they wear their enemies' armour they will be able to achieve surprise and be able to kill the Greeks easily. Although this plan falls through as the Trojan warriors mistake their own men for Greeks and shoot some of them down with arrows. Obviously this plan wasn't thought through thoroughly. During the war Aeneas witnesses the death of King Priam who was slaughtered at the Alter by Pyrrhus after watching his son be struck down in front of his own eyes. From this gruesome event Aeneas remembers his own dear father who he had left behind and goes back to find him. A Roman would criticise Aeneas for leaving his father in the first place but admire him for going back to save him from the clutches of death. While alone in the temple of Vesta Aeneas catches sight of Helen of Sparta, the reason the war broke out in the first place. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although he does make a small mistake in that through all of the frantic running and blazing fires Aeneas looses Creusa, his wife. This could have been prevented by telling her to run beside him instead of behind or looking round every so often to check if she is all right. Aeneas only realises Creusa's disappearance when he has reached safety of Ceres' shrine. When Aeneas realises that Creusa has gone he suddenly panics, loosing his wits and becoming confused. Leaving his son and father while he goes back to look for Creusa. The Romans would respect Aeneas for risking his life to look for his wife who might be in danger and Aeneas does not have to worry about his son and father, as they are safe. In Book 2 we are shown a lot of Aeneas's behaviour, and although at the start he does forget his duty of being a husband, father and son he soon regains his knowledge and puts his own life at risk in getting his family to safety. Aeneas's actions show that he has a love for fighting and this love may sometimes overcome his love for his family which the Romans may frown on, although he shows determination in the fight for his country, not giving up on several occasions when told there is no hope. ...read more.

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