• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10

What was life like in the Roman Army and what made them successful?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Roman Army By Abhishek Kulkarni 5.4 What was life like in the Roman Army and what made them successful? Contents Page P.I & II - Cover and Contents P.III - Introduction to the Roman Army P.IV- Ranks and Training in the Roman Army P.V- Equipment and Weapons P.VI- Weapons (cont.) and Artillery P.VII- Artillery (cont.) P.VIII- The testudo and pay in the Roman Army P.IX- Conclusion What was life like in the Roman Army and what made them successful? The Roman Army (100 BC- 100AD) Introduction The Roman army was a complex and well-built organisation. They were used in daily life to keep order in society and use their architectural skills to build roads and other things essential to the developing Roman life. All of the soldiers were taught to not react to violence, and this is what they did; it gave them the capability to kill hundreds of other men, and not think about it, only about the benefit to the Roman Empire. Training was by far the hardest part of a soldier's time in the Army for they were pushed to the point of exhaustion, only to make them stronger in battle. ...read more.

Middle

Each soldier had: * Cassis- helmet- The cassis was a bronze general issue helmet. This was not very strong, although the strength was very rarely tested as weapons were not as accurate as they are now. * Lorica Segmentata-armour- the Lorica Segmentata. It consisted of many plates of armour layered upon the one before it. Pieces of a Lorica Segmentata found at the site of Verulamium * Scutum- shield- The Roman soldier's frontal protection was the scutum. It was a shield that stood 40 inches tall, and 30 wide. It was curved to give protection from the sides as well. These shields were normally good, although as above, it was highly unlikely they would withstand a barrage of pilum attacks. A scutum found at Colchester Weapons The Romans had a massive array of weapons, which was one of the many reasons of their overwhelming success. The two most common weapons, which were standard issue to the milites, were the gladius and the pilum. These were the key to a successful battle, as the gladius was used for short-range fighting, whereas the pilum was used to damage enemies further away. * Gladius- sword, 18-24 inches long-The gladius was a very effective sword. ...read more.

Conclusion

The reason for the increase in trade was due to the fact that Domitian's army was ever-expanding and invading countries which were rich of raw materials and other precious items. This value of 225 denarii was a good amount, compared to what other Romans would earn, and after leaving the army once 25 years had been served, the well-respected, or faithful and brave soldiers would be cared for by the Consul, something that no other profession would provide; a 'pension'. Conclusion On the whole, life for Roman soldiers was relatively nice. Although the training and physical aspect of the job proved to be a challenge, there were also many benefits; good pay, accommodation when not fighting, and most importantly for some of the soldiers, with the job came a title of nobility, and women were often encouraged to marry these brave men over commoners. As well as this, the efficiency of which war and training was executed was exemplary and the weapons were also something that wouldn't be complained about. Compared to some of the other soldiers in other, smaller legions in other countries, the Roman soldiers were living in 'luxury', with everything they needed when they were serving in the Army, and once they had retired also. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Classics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Classics essays

  1. Assess the role of Themistocles in the Greek defeat of the Persians in 480 ...

    the old men and the movable possessions to Salamis" indicating how an organized evacuation and sacrifice of Athens may have been planned by Themistocles before his defeats at Thermopylae and Artemisium. Bradley recognizes this as the reason for the small force of 300 Spartan troops defending the Thermopylae pass and,

  2. Medea - Euripides lived during the Golden Age of Athens, the city where he ...

    Commentary The balance of the play will continually evidence one of the hallmarks of dramatic art: irony of situation. Irony involves a cleft between appearance and reality. It can manifest itself in a play when a character, such as Jason, lacks a knowledge held by the audience or reader, such as Medea's plans to murder her children.

  1. Alexander The Great - Analysis of the Film

    Some of the army married the locals even . They marched up the river swat and then climbed Pirsoe . They were then taken by a local guide at night to the rivein . It took them seven days and seven nights to build a bridge . They finally crossed the bridge and massacred the Indians .

  2. Who made the greatest contribution to the Athenian Constitution?

    Do I Make Myself Clear? Yes, Your Highness, of course, as you wish. I first took control of Athens in the year 561 BC, but unfortunately, was evicted from office on two occasions by political foes. However, both times, I returned even stronger and ruled until 527 BC.

  1. What can we learn from ancient sources about the role of Greek women in ...

    Enjoying the sexual company of other men was considered far more rewarding than their heterosexual relationships. Although men were entitled to what they thought of as the privilege to commit the act of adultery, women had the complete opposite allowance.

  2. Alexander the Great: Battle of Gaugamela

    This, Arrian believed to be a major mistake, ultimately causing Darius' defeat since the next day Alexander's men were well rested whereas Darius' were exhausted. Giving his men rest and food also shows how Alexander was a responsible leader and furthermore he would have respect from his men for doing so.

  1. Pericles and Athens in the 5th century BC

    To spread the valves of democracy and destroy tyranny, to liberate lionia from Persian influences to ransack Persian territory and take booty as compensation for the damage suffered in the Persian wars. To unite the disparate Greek states and to form a rival power bloc to the Peloponnesian league.

  2. Pompeii is famous as a Roman town yet it owes much to the influence ...

    layout for the rest of Pompeii, making it a regular geometric grid. But towards the end of the 5th century BC the Osco-Greek town was invaded and conquered by a stronger race of people, the Samnites.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work