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What was life like in the Roman Army and what made them successful?

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Introduction

The Roman Army By Abhishek Kulkarni 5.4 What was life like in the Roman Army and what made them successful? Contents Page P.I & II - Cover and Contents P.III - Introduction to the Roman Army P.IV- Ranks and Training in the Roman Army P.V- Equipment and Weapons P.VI- Weapons (cont.) and Artillery P.VII- Artillery (cont.) P.VIII- The testudo and pay in the Roman Army P.IX- Conclusion What was life like in the Roman Army and what made them successful? The Roman Army (100 BC- 100AD) Introduction The Roman army was a complex and well-built organisation. They were used in daily life to keep order in society and use their architectural skills to build roads and other things essential to the developing Roman life. All of the soldiers were taught to not react to violence, and this is what they did; it gave them the capability to kill hundreds of other men, and not think about it, only about the benefit to the Roman Empire. Training was by far the hardest part of a soldier's time in the Army for they were pushed to the point of exhaustion, only to make them stronger in battle. ...read more.

Middle

Each soldier had: * Cassis- helmet- The cassis was a bronze general issue helmet. This was not very strong, although the strength was very rarely tested as weapons were not as accurate as they are now. * Lorica Segmentata-armour- the Lorica Segmentata. It consisted of many plates of armour layered upon the one before it. Pieces of a Lorica Segmentata found at the site of Verulamium * Scutum- shield- The Roman soldier's frontal protection was the scutum. It was a shield that stood 40 inches tall, and 30 wide. It was curved to give protection from the sides as well. These shields were normally good, although as above, it was highly unlikely they would withstand a barrage of pilum attacks. A scutum found at Colchester Weapons The Romans had a massive array of weapons, which was one of the many reasons of their overwhelming success. The two most common weapons, which were standard issue to the milites, were the gladius and the pilum. These were the key to a successful battle, as the gladius was used for short-range fighting, whereas the pilum was used to damage enemies further away. * Gladius- sword, 18-24 inches long-The gladius was a very effective sword. ...read more.

Conclusion

The reason for the increase in trade was due to the fact that Domitian's army was ever-expanding and invading countries which were rich of raw materials and other precious items. This value of 225 denarii was a good amount, compared to what other Romans would earn, and after leaving the army once 25 years had been served, the well-respected, or faithful and brave soldiers would be cared for by the Consul, something that no other profession would provide; a 'pension'. Conclusion On the whole, life for Roman soldiers was relatively nice. Although the training and physical aspect of the job proved to be a challenge, there were also many benefits; good pay, accommodation when not fighting, and most importantly for some of the soldiers, with the job came a title of nobility, and women were often encouraged to marry these brave men over commoners. As well as this, the efficiency of which war and training was executed was exemplary and the weapons were also something that wouldn't be complained about. Compared to some of the other soldiers in other, smaller legions in other countries, the Roman soldiers were living in 'luxury', with everything they needed when they were serving in the Army, and once they had retired also. ...read more.

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