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An Investigation into Convenience Foods

Free essay example:

Food & Nutrition Coursework

An Investigation into Convenience Foods

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Introduction

For this project I have chosen to investigate convenience foods particularly frozen ready meals as we often have these at home.

I will need to find out some initial information

Task Analysis

WHAT

TYPES OF CONVENIENCE FOODS – READY MEALS – FROZEN – CHILLED- DRIED

TYPES OF MEALS AVAILABLE – PIZZA, PASTA, CHICKEN, MEAT, FISH RICE POTATOES, SWEET FOODS.

WHO

CHILDREN, ADULTS, OLDER PEOPLE, WORKING PEOPLE, SINGLE PEOPLE, TEENAGERS,

WHERE

SOLD IN SUPERMARKETS, LOCAL SHOPS,  TAKE AWAYS STORES.

EATEN AT HOME, WORK, WHILST TRAVELLING.

WHEN

DIFFERENT MEAL TIMES – BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, SNACK

AFTER WORK, WEEKENDS DAYS OFF

HOW

CARRY OUT RESEARCH, SURVEYS, QUESTIONNAIRES

WHY

TO FIND OUT IF READY MEALS ARE GOOD FOR US?

ARE HOME MADE DISHES BETTER?

DO THEY SAVE TIME?

DO THEY SAVE MONEY?

Research for my investigation

I will need to use a variety of methods for my research including primary research such as surveys, interviews and questionnaires also the secondary research will be from books, magazines, journals, leaflets and the internet

I will be investigating the following using the methods indicated

Investigate

Method

What are convenience foods?

Books

Types?

Do questionnaires and surveys

Popularity?

Magazines, newspapers, leaflets, shops

Nutritional content, information

Books, internet, school meals

What are Convenience Foods

I need to find out what convenience foods are. I have found the following information on the Internet and the sites I have referenced them

Convenience foods both save time and are away of keeping food for longer. Examples of these foods are frozen/ready meals and snacks, dried foods, canned foods and chilled foods.

Freezing is a popular method of food preservation and most households will have a freezer or at least a freezing compartment in the fridge. There are many meals available to us that are on display in the freezers in supermarkets

Long-term freezing requires a constant temperature of -18 °C or less. Some freezers cannot achieve such low temperature. The time food can be kept in the freezer is reduced considerably if the temperature in a freezer fluctuates. Fluctuations could occur by a small gap in the freezer door or adding a large amount of unfrozen food can change the temperature.

Disadvantges of convenience foods are:

  • Typically they are manufactured from almost inedible agricultural products
  • They typically are high in fat and calorie contents
  • The reduced time cost and nutritional content associated with these foods is specifically blamed for obesity
  • Sometimes Genetically Modified (GMO) Foods are used
  • Sometimes an irradiation process is used
  • Preservatives are almost always used

Food processing is the set of methods and techniques used to transform raw ingredients into food for consumption by humans or animals. The food processing industry utilizes these processes. Food processing often takes clean, harvested or slaughtered and butchered components and uses these to produce attractive and marketable food products. Similar processes are used to produce animal feed.

Following are common food processing techniques:

  • removal of unwanted outer layers, such as potato peeling or the skinning of Peaches
  • Chopping or slicing, of which examples include potato chips, diced carrot, or candied peel.
  • Mincing and macerating
  • Liquefaction, such as to produce fruit juice
  • Emulsification
  • Cooking, such as boiling, broiling, frying, steaming or grilling
  • Mixing
  • Addition of gas such as air entrainment for bread or gasification of soft drinks
  • Proofing
  • spray drying

Food processing dates back to the prehistoric ages when crude processing incorporated slaughtering, various types of cooking, such as over fires, smoking, steaming, oven baking, fermenting, sun drying and preserving with salt. Foods preserved this way were a common part of warriors and sailor's diets up until the introduction of canned food. These crude processing techniques remained essentially the same until the advent of the industrial revolution.

Modern food processing technologies in the 19th and 20th century were largely developed to serve military needs. There was a technique developed a vacuum bottling process to supply troops in the army with food, which would eventually lead to tinning and then canning. Although initially expensive and somewhat hazardous due to lead used in the cans, canned goods would later become a staple around the world. Pasteurization was a significant advance in ensuring micro-biological safety of food.

the developing consumer society in the developed world furthered the development of food processing with advances such as spray drying, juice concentrates, freeze drying and the introduction of artificial sweeteners, colorants, and preservatives such as sodium benzoate and saccharine. In the late 20th century products such as dried instant soups, reconstituted fruits and juices,

Benefits

Benefits of food processing include toxin removal, preservation, improving flavor, easing marketing and distribution tasks, and increasing food consistency. In addition, it increases seasonal availability of many foods, enables transportation of delicate perishable foods across long distances, and makes many kinds of foods safe to eat by removing the microorganisms. Modern supermarkets would not be capable without modern food processing techniques, long voyages would not be possible, and military campaigns would be significantly more difficult and costly to execute.

Modern food processing also improves the quality of life for allergies, diabetics, and other people who cannot consume some common food elements. Food processing can also add extra nutrients.

Drawbacks

Food processing can lower the nutritional value of some foods. Some preservatives added or created during processing such as slats may cause adverse health effects on some consumers. In addition, high quality and hygiene standards must be maintained to ensure consumer safety and failures to maintain adequate standards can have serious health consequences.

In general, fresh food that has not been processed other than by washing and simple kitchen preparation, may be expected to contain a higher proportion of naturally occurring vitamins, fibre and minerals than the equivalent product processed by the food industry. However fresh materials are more liable to early spoilage and are often unsuited to long distance transportation from source to shelf. Fresh materials, such as fresh produce and raw meats, are also more likely capable of producing disease

These products tend to be used because of:

  • Cost there usually quite cheap
  • Time Costs. Convenience foods reduce the time it takes to prepare dinners significantly.
  • Variety. Due to packaging techniques such as canning and freezing, foods are available at all times of the year.
  • Food Safety. Packaging and processing techniques, such as canning, freezing, and irradiation, reduce spoilage and the presence of bacteria in the consumed products.

The Popularity of Ready Meals

The ready meals market has grown considerably in recent years. Total sales in the UK were valued at £1.78 billion in 2001, up 46% on 1997. Ready meals include: chilled (53% of the value of retail sales); frozen (40%); and room temperature (7%) – including instant hot snacks.

  • The UK chilled ready meals sector is the most highly developed in Europe in terms of the range of products available and total sales.
  • As many as half of all new ready meal launches use international or ethnic recipes.
  • Low fat and low-calorie only account for a small percentage of new product developments. Most of these types are within existing well-known brands such as Weight Watchers from Heinz.
  • New product developments are likely to focus on healthiness, although not necessarily low-fat/low-calorie. The emphasis is more on wholesome fresh ingredients.

Who eats ready meals?

  • Ready meals are used in 77% of households.
  • Of those that use ready meals, 28% use them more than once a week, 26% once a week and 44% three times a month or less frequently.
  • 32% of households with children use ready meals more than once a week; compared to 26% of households without children.
  • Ready meals are eaten most by 15-19 years olds; and least by the over-64s.
  • Use does not vary greatly between income bands so price does not seem to be a very significant barrier to purchase. However, ready meals are used slightly more often by people who are better off.

Chilled meals

  • The chilled ready meals market has grown considerably in recent years. In 2001, this was 90% higher by value than 1997.
  • Chilled meats are perceived as fresher than frozen and room temperature meals.
  • The market is dominated by own-label products: Marks and Spencer 28%, Tesco 22%, Sainsbury’s 20%; Asda 11%, Safeway 6%, Waitrose 4%, other own-label 8%, and brands 2%.

Breakdown in types of chilled ready meals sold:

  • Indian 24%
  • Italian 23%
  • Traditional British 22%
  • Chinese/Asian (including Thai) 17%
  • Other international (such as Spanish, Cajun, Caribbean) 9%

Frozen meals

  • The frozen ready meals market was fairly stable for many years, but has been growing since 1999. In 2001, the market was 14% higher by value than in 1997.
  • Frozen meals are perceived to be of lower quality and less healthy than chilled meals.
  • Frozen meals are commonly served to children.

     Breakdown in types of frozen ready meals sold:

  • International 50%
  • Traditional 28%
  • Fish-based 12%
  • Healthy recipe 10%

Complete ready meals dominate the frozen ready meals sector (80%) with part meals that need other cooked items to be added (such as vegetables) making up the remaining 20%.

Microwave meal (also referred to as a frozen dinner, ready meal, or TV dinner because it is often eaten while watching TV) is a prepackaged, frozen meal which usually comes packaged in a flat cardboard box. They require very little preparation, and contain all the elements of the meal in one package. An example might be a chicken tikka masala meal, where the rice, chicken, and all other ingredients are prepackaged in a plastic tray.

They are typically purchased at a supermarket and stored in the freezer for later use. When it is time to prepare them, the plastic cover is removed or vented, and the meal is heated in a microwave oven for a few minutes, after which a fully prepared meal is ready—one requiring minimal effort to prepare. They are the ultimate in convenience, particularly for providing a relatively complex meal with no preparation time, but they can be more expensive than preparing food from scratch (though oftentimes the opposite is true).

The freezing process tends to lose the flavour of food, and the meals are often heavily processed with extra salt and fat to compensate. The dinners are almost always significantly less nutritious than fresh food, and are formulated to remain edible after long periods of storage so will need added preservatives

In recent years there has been a push by a number of independent manufacturers and retailers in making microwave and ready meals that are low in salt, fat and free of artificial additives.

Many microwave meals are fully cooked during preparation, and need only to be reheated by the consumer (thus eliminating the possibility of undercooking by misjudging microwave powers and cooking times), but more recently versions have been produced whose packaging is designed to operate as a steamer, allowing rapid cooking of essentially raw ingredients (typically fish and vegetables) immediately before consumption.

This information was researched using the internet (Wikipedia)

I have found that there are advantages and disadvantages to buying and eating ready made foods and I now want to find out abut the range of meals available

RANGE OF READY MEALS

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From the information I have found it appears that although ready meals are very popular in the UK and it is a growing market the meal itself is not really very good for us.

I want to find out how popular they are and the reasons that people buy them and whether they know how bad they can be.

I want to find out about the views of young people (11-16 years) when it comes to using ready meals as part of their diet so I have devised some simple questions to ask a group of students at school.

I asked 20 year 7 – year 11 students at my school

Here is my questionnaire with results

Questionnaire

  • DO YOU KNOW WHAT READY MEALS ARE?

                : Yes                       : No

  • HOW OFTEN DO YOU HAVE READY MEALS?

: Daily         : Weekly     : Monthly

  • DO READY MEALS TATSE BETTER THAN COOKED OR PREPARED?

: YES          : NO                : THE SAME              : DON’T KNOW

  • DO YOU THINK READY/FROZEN MEALS ARE EXPENSIVE?

: YES                         : NO                     : SAME PRICE                : DON’T KNOW

  • ARE READY/FROZEN MEALS HEALTHY?

: YES                           : NO                           : NOT SURE

  • DO THEY SAVE TIME?

: YES                           : NO

  • DO YOU THINK READY/FROZEN MEALS ARE EXPENSIVE?

: YES                           : NO                             : SAME PRICE         : DON’T KNOW

  • TICK ALL THE TYPES OF MEALS YOU BUY?
  • PIZZA
  • CURRY RICE
  • ROAST DINNERS
  • PASTA DISHES
  • POTATO DISHES
  • ARE READY MEALS HEALTHY?

: NO                                    : YES                         : DON’T KNOW

  • DO YOU BUY READY MEALS THAT ARE LABELLED AS HEALTHY?

: YES                                  : NO

  • DO YOU PREFER READ/FROZEN MEALS TO COOKING YOURSELF?

: YES                                  : NO

IF YES EXPLAIN WHY

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

  • HOW MUCH DO YOU SPEND ON READY MEALS?

£0.75-£1.00                                 £1.00-£2.50                       £2.50+

Results

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14 out of the 20 students asked knew what ready meals were which could indicate that they eat them at some time

75% of the students asked had ready meals at least once a week (4 students ticked the daily box)

This indicates that the ready meal industry is a big one

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Although a lot of them have ready meals frequently they do not seem to like them very much most of them said that they prefer prepared meals from home.

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The results show that the curry rice is the most preferred dish following the roast dishes. Curry rice dihes aren’t similar to home-prepare meals that’s why people prefer them instead

From the information I have collected so far I am ready to write the title of my task

Investigate the use of ready meals amongst young people and try and encourage them to make more foods from scratch at home

I will need to develop this idea and here is a list of my criteria for completion

  • Completion of my Questionnaire to find out the popularity and types of ready meals that are eaten by young people
  • Supermarket survey of types of meals available
  • Tasting sessions of a variety of ready meals
  • Ideas for practical work that will encourage young people to make their own meals

Supermarket Survey

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Good for you Chicken in black bean sauce with egg fried rice400G 
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£1.98

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Good for you Yorkshire pudding with chicken and vegetables380G 
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£1.98

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Good for you beef stew and dumplings400G 
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£2.28

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Good for you ciabatta bread - garlic & herb240G 
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£0.98

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Good for you cumberland pie450G 
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£1.48

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Good for you Sweet and sour chicken with rice400G 
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£1.74

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Good for you chilli and rice400GR 
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£1.48

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Good for you chicken and broccoli pie400G 
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£1.48

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Good for you liver and bacon with creamy mash400GR 
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£1.48

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Good for you chicken casserole400GR 
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£1.98

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Good for you cottage pie400GR 
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£1.32

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Good for you ham and mushroom tagliatelle400G 
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£1.48

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Good for you chicken arrabiatta450GR 
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£1.98

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Good for you chicken spinach bake400G 
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£1.98

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Good for you lasagne400G 
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£1.32

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Good for you sausage and mash400G 
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£1.48

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I have gathered information on ready/frozen meals from ASDA store so i could prepare the meals and find out what people really liked

Taster 1 Sweet and Sour Chicken with rice

Appearance

Texture

Taste

Taster 2 Yorkshire pudding with chicken and vegetables

Appearance

Texture

Taste

Taster 3 Sweet and Sour Chicken with rice

Appearance

Texture

Taste

Taster 4 lasagne

Appearance

Texture

Taste

☺☹

Ideas for practical work

Savoury / sweet

Specification for dishes

Attractive

Appeal to young people

Enjoyable to make

Dish could be frozen

Healthy –reduce fat increase fibre

Practical no 1

BRIEF  

 For this practical I wanted to compare the readymade spaghetti Bolognese and homemade to see which would taste better, save time, which is cheaper and also healthier etc

DISHES CHOSEN

Spaghetti Bolognese (Home prepared)

Spaghetti Bolognese (Readymade meal)

RECIPES

Recipe

Ingredients

Equipment
Chopping board, knife, measuring jug, measuring spoons, saucepan, baking dish, garlic press, can opener, spatula, colander

Method
1. Dice onion and fry with the garlic for 5 minutes.
2. Add minced beef and cook until it turns brown.
3. Add sliced mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes.
4. Stir in canned tomatoes, puree and herbs. Simmer for 20 minutes.
5. Boil water in a large saucepan. When the water is boiling add spaghetti and cook for 10 minutes or until tender.
6. Drain using a colander.
7. To serve, place spaghetti on a plate and cover with sauce.

http://cook.dannemann.org.uk/cooking/mains/bolognese/

REASONS FOR CHOICE

* To compare both meals on which would taste better

*To compare which meal would save time

*To compare which meal would be cheaper

*to evaluate which one would be healthier for your diet

PLAN OF WORK

INGREDIENTS

EQUIPMENT

OTHER

Onions

Chopping Board

Microwave

Cheese

Tablespoon

Minced Beef

Grater

Tomatoes

Frying pan/ Wok

Saucepan

Chili pepper

Wooden spoon

salt

Teaspoon

spaghetti

Butter

ORDER OF WORK

TIME

ACTIVITY

CHECKS

0-10

Collect ingredients and equipment, Get ready-apron, wash hands, Oven on

10-20

Wash, peel and chop onions, Chop green, red peppers

20-30

Fry the onions with the mince for about 5mins and then add green, red peppers and fry for a few more minutes

30-40

Add the tomatoes, herbs, ketchup , Bolognese sauce,chilli spices and about half a cup of water

40-50

Simmer for 20-30 minutes until its really thick and lovely, Add the pasta to the saucepan of boiling water

50-60

Check the seasoning and the pasta

60-70

Drain the spaghetti and heat up the ready meal in the microwave(read instructions on how to reheat)

80-90

Wash up all equipment used and tidy tables, wiping down work surfaces and putting all the equipment away after drying

90-100

Present the dishes made, Evaluate results in groups, individually, with teacher, Take a picture of the dish fro proof that it was made

TASTE TEST SHEETS

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE =  3

 LIKE                                      =  4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Cooked Meal

Ingredients

Appearance

Texture

Taste

Total

Spaghetti

4/3/3/4

4/3/3/3

3/4/2/3

39

Bolognese

3/2/4/3

4/3/4/2

5/4/4/3

41

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE  = 3

 LIKE                                      = 4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Ready Meal

Ingredients

Appearance

Texture

Taste

Total

Spaghetti

4/4/3/3

2/1/2/2

2/2/1/2

28

Bolognese

1/2/1/2

1/1/1/1

1/0/0/1

12

Price comparison

Home prepared meal                         Spaghetti Bolognese (Readymade meal)

Total =£2.85

Onions =£0.10

Cheese =£1.19

Minced Beef =£1.20

Tomatoes =£0.45

Chili pepper =£0.65

Salt =£0.15

Spaghetti =£1.25

Butter =£0.85

Total =£5.99

The tables show how much the ingredients cost by looking at this I am comparing which meal would be cheaper and it shows that the readymade spaghetti Bolognese would be a lot cheaper to buy than going to the shop and buying the ingredients but it doesn’t taste as good as the prepared spaghetti Bolognese with much more ingredients in it

Evaluation of my dishes

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These are the two dishes I prepared both meals look delicious but they might taste different due to the ingredients used the method which was used to prepare the meals and also the time it took to prepare the meal

The picture says it all students who did the taste sheets and tasted my meal preferred the cooked meal because it had more taste it was spicy whereas the ready made had no taste all you could taste was the Bolognese and the, majority of the spaghetti was less than the Bolognese. It took me about 15 minz max to prepare the Bolognese and the spaghetti took about 8minz to cook properly and with the ready made meal I only had to remove from packaging and reheat in the microwave.  image15.jpg

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From my taste sheets and pictures take it shows that the home cooked meal was better that the readymade meal even though it took longer to prepare it still looks better and taste better than the 5minutes readymade meal. The home cooked meal had a better taste took longer to prepare it also cost more but still tasted better at the end of the day its not about quantity ts about quality so I would recommend the readymade spaghetti Bolognese because it does not taste as better as the home cooked. If you look closely at the after picture it shows that people preferred the home cooked because it had a better taste and wasn’t saggy like the readymade and people preferred the home cooked because home prepared most people don’t trust the readymade meals because they go through processes and are added with ingredients we don’t know about that’s why people would prefer the home cooked because it is enrichened with ingredients people are familiar with. All my results show that the home cooked meal was the best out of the two

Practical no 2

BRIEF  

 For this practical I wanted to compare the home baked Swiss roll and a shop bought Swiss roll to evaluate which would taste better save time and also be cheaper

DISHES CHOSEN

Swiss Roll (Home prepared)

Swiss Roll (Readymade Shop)

RECIPES

The Ultimate GCSE recipe book

REASONS FOR CHOICE

* To compare both meals on which would taste better

*To compare which meal would save time

*To compare which meal would be cheaper

*to evaluate which one would be healthier for your diet

EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

PLAN OF WORK

CHECK LIST FOR RESOURCES

INGREDIENTS

EQUIPMENT

OTHER

cc

Swiss roll tin

scissors,

75g caster sugar

Mixing Bowl

cooling rack and sharp knife

75g flour(plain or self raising)

Wooden/Plastic spoon

Pastry brush

Jam

Greaseproof paper

Weighing scales

ORDER OF WORK

TIME

ACTIVITY

CHECKS

0-10

Wash hands and put apron on, Collect equipment

Preheat oven to 200ºC or gas mark 6, Wipe down work surfaces

10-20

Line and grease a Swiss roll tin, with greaseproof paper. 

Break the eggs and Whisk the eggs with sugar together until thick, creamy and white.(about 5mins with the electric whisk)

20-30

Gently fold in the flour, into the mixture using a metal spoon, a little at a time. Make sure not to knock out any air out using a tablespoon

30-40

Pour the mixture into the Swiss roll tin. Spread evenly

Bake for 8 – 10 minutes, until golden brown and firm and springy to the touch. Do not overcook.  

40-50

While the Swiss roll is baking,   place a piece of greaseproof paper on the work surface and sprinkle the extra sugar on top. Warm the jam in a microwave for 10 – 15 seconds.  

50-60

When the Swiss roll is cooked, tip it onto the sugared paper. Peel off the lining paper from the cake. 

60-70

Spread the warm jam over the cake with a palette knife.

70-80

Roll the cake, using the paper and a tea towel to help you.

Leave to cool

80-90

Wash up equipments and clean down the surface area

90-100

Take photos of the dishes and evaluate

TASTE TEST SHEETS

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE =  3

 LIKE                                      =  4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Tick one box in each column

Ready Made Swiss Roll

APPEARANCE

TEXTURE

SMELL

TASTE

OVERALL VIEW

4

1

1

1

7

1st test

5

4

3

3

15

2nd test

5

4

4

4

17

3rd test

5

4

4

4

17

4th test

5

3

3

3

14

5th test

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE =  3

 LIKE                                      =  4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Home cooked Swiss Roll

APPEARANCE

TEXTURE

SMELL

TASTE

OVERALL VIEW

3

4

3

4

14

1st test

2

4

3

3

12

2nd test

2

2

4

3

11

3rd test

4

3.5

3

4

14.5

4th test

3

4

3

5

15

5th test

image20.png

image21.png

On this practical the readymade Swiss roll was better than the home prepared because people who did the taste sheets and tasted the Swiss rolls said that the readymade was too sweet but the texture of it was smooth whereas the home prepared was also smooth but didn’t have enough sugar people complained that it was cracking as well and it was too soft. If I had added more jam and sugar to it and also bake it for longer it would have come out better. Also if you look at the picture people preferred the home cooked Swiss roll because it wasn’t too sweet as the readymade and also it didn’t have too much sugar in it

Equipment

Swiss roll tin, electric hand mixer, weighing scales, greaseproof baking paper, pencil, scissors, pastry brush, palette knife, sieve, mixing bowl, large metal spoon, cooling rack and sharp knife.

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 200ºC or gas mark 6.  
  2. Line and grease a Swiss roll tin, 18cm x 30cm with greaseproof paper.   
  3. Sieve the flour.  
  4. Whisk the eggs and sugar together until thick, creamy and white.   
  5. Gently fold in the flour, using a metal spoon, a little at a time.  
  6. Pour the mixture into the Swiss roll tin.  
  7. Bake for 8 – 10 minutes, until golden brown and firm to the touch. Do not overcook.  
  8. While the Swiss roll is baking,   place a piece of greaseproof paper on the work surface and sprinkle the extra sugar on top. Warm the jam in a microwave for 10 – 15 seconds.  
  9. When the Swiss roll is cooked, tip it onto the sugared paper. Peel off the lining paper from the cake.  
  10. Spread the warm jam over the cake with a palette knife. 
  11. Roll the cake, using the paper and a tea towel to help you.   
  12. Place on a cooling rack. 

image22.jpg

image23.jpg

Price comparison

Home prepared meal                         Swiss Roll (Ready Made)

Total =£0.99

3 eggs =£0.75

75g caster sugar =£0.65

75g flour (plain or self raising) =£0.85

Jam =£0.75

Total =£3.00

The price comparison is showing that the ready-made Swiss roll was cheaper than preparing the homemade Swiss roll by £2.00.so the convenience Swiss roll was better in taste which is showed in the taste tests results also saves time last but not least it was a lot cheaper

image24.jpg

image25.jpg

image26.jpg

Practical no 3

BRIEF  

 For this practical I wanted to compare the home Tesco frozen cheese and tomato, Ham and cheese Pizza and a home prepared pizza to evaluate which would taste better save time and also be cheaper

DISHES CHOSEN

Cheese and tomato pizza (Home prepared)

Tesco frozen cheese and tomato (Readymade Shop)

RECIPES

The Ultimate GCSE recipe book

REASONS FOR CHOICE

* To compare both meals on which would taste better

*To compare which meal would save time

*To compare which meal would be cheaper

*to evaluate which one would be healthier for your diet

EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

TIME PLAN

PLAN OF WORK

CHECK LIST FOR RESOURCES

INGREDIENTS

EQUIPMENT

OTHER

150 g self-rising flour

Mixing bowl

baking tray,

25g margarine

Weighing scales

measuring spoons,

50ml milk

Sharp knife,                                                              

Pastry brush

25g tomato purée

Measuring jug,                                                          

flour dredger,

50g cheese

Rolling pin,                                                                

1 onion  

sieve,

ORDER OF WORK

TIME

ACTIVITY

CHECKS

0-10

Wash hands and put apron on, Collect equipment, Preheat oven to 200ºC or gas mark 6, Wipe down work surfaces

10-20

Grease a baking tray, Sift the flour into a bowl.

20-30

Rub the margarine into the flour until it resembles fine breadcrumbs, Whisk the egg and milk together in a small bowl with a fork.  

30-40

Add the egg mixture to the flour. Mix to form a soft dough ball. Roll out the dough to form a large circle, on a floured surface. 

40-50

Transfer it onto the baking tray; Spread the tomato purée over the base of the pizza.  

50-60

Slice the tomato. Peel and slice the onion. Slice the mushrooms. 

60-70

Arrange the tomato, onion and mushrooms over the base. Grate the cheese. 

70-80

Sprinkle the grated cheese and herbs on top.  Place in the oven and bake for 10-15 minutes, until golden brown

80-90

Wash up equipments and clean down the surface area

90-100

Serve.  Take photos of the dishes and evaluate

TASTE TEST SHEETS

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE =  3

 LIKE                                      =  4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Tick one box in each column

Ready Made Cheese Tomato Pizza

APPEARANCE

TEXTURE

SMELL

TASTE

OVERALL VIEW

3

2

2

3

10

1st test

2

3

1

3

9

2nd test

3

3

1

2

9

3rd test

3

3

2

1

9

4th test

4

3

3

3

13

5th test

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE =  3

 LIKE                                      =  4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Home cooked Cheese Tomato Pizza

APPEARANCE

TEXTURE

SMELL

TASTE

OVERALL VIEW

4

3

2

4

13

1st test

3

4

3

3

13

2nd test

3

3

3

4

13

3rd test

4

3

3

4

14

4th test

3

2

3

4

12

5th test

image27.jpg

Price comparison

Home prepared meal                        Tesco cheese and tomato (Ready Made)

Total =£2.99

150 g self-rising flour = £0.95

25g margarine =£0.35

50ml milk =£0.50

25g tomato purée =£0.45

50g cheese =£0.65

1 onion  =£0.10

Practical no 4

BRIEF  

 For this practical I wanted to compare the home made Lemon Cheesecake to the Tesco Value Lemon Cheesecake to compare which is better for taste, quality and cost

DISHES CHOSEN

Lemon Cheesecake (Home prepared)

Tesco Value Lemon Cheesecake  (Readymade Shop)

REASONS FOR CHOICE

* To compare both meals on which would taste better

*To compare which meal would save time

*To compare which meal would be cheaper

*to evaluate which one would be healthier for your diet

EQUIPMENT REQUIRED

TIME PLAN

PLAN OF WORK

CHECK LIST FOR RESOURCES

INGREDIENTS

EQUIPMENT

OTHER

Crushed Vanilla Wafers

 Cup

Grated lemon pee,

Sugar

Tbsp

Lemon juice,

Butter or margarine

 Tbsp

Vanilla

4 eggs

3/4 cup,                                                          

Cornstarch,

Cream Cheese

1/4 cup,                                                                

Flour

1/2 tsp

ORDER OF WORK

TIME

ACTIVITY

CHECKS

0-10

Wash hands and put apron on, Collect equipment, PREHEAT oven to 325°F, Wipe down work surfaces

10-20

Mix crumbs, 3 Tbsp. sugar and butter press firmly onto bottom of pan. Bake 10 minutes.

20-30

SEPARATE 1 of the eggs. Cover and refrigerate egg yolk for later use. Set egg white aside. Beat cream cheese, 1 cup sugar, flour, lemon peel, 2 Tbsp. juice and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until well blended

30-40

Add egg white and remaining 3 whole eggs, one at a time, mixing on low speed after each addition just until blended. Pour over crust.

40-50

Bake for 50 to 55 minutes or until center is almost set.
Run knife or metal spatula around rim of pan to loosen cake cool before removing rim of pan.

50-60

MIX 3/4-cup sugar and cornstarch in medium saucepan, gradually stir in 1/2-cup water and 1/4-cup juice until well blended.

60-70

Bring just to boil on medium heat, stirring constantly, cook and stir until clear and thickened. Beat reserved egg yolk lightly with fork.
Stir in 2 Tbsp. of the hot cornstarch mixture

70-80

Return to remaining cornstarch mixture in saucepan, mix until well blended. Cook 1 minute or until thickened, stirring constantly. Cool slightly. Spoon topping over cheesecake, refrigerate until set.

80-90

Wash up equipments and clean down the surface area

90-100

Serve.  Take photos of the dishes and evaluate

TASTE TEST SHEETS

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE =  3

 LIKE                                      =  4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Tick one box in each column

Ready Lemon Cheesecake

APPEARANCE

TEXTURE

SMELL

TASTE

OVERALL VIEW

3

3

4

3

13

1st test

2

3

3

4

12

2nd test

3

3

3

4

13

3rd test

3

3

4

4

14

4th test

4

3

3

3

13

5th test

DISLIKE A LOT                     =  1

DISLIKE                                =  2

NEITHER LIKE OR DISLIKE =  3

 LIKE                                      =  4

LIKE VERY MUCH                   = 5

Home cooked Lemon Cheesecake

APPEARANCE

TEXTURE

SMELL

TASTE

OVERALL VIEW

4

3

2

4

13

1st test

3

4

3

3

13

2nd test

3

3

3

4

13

3rd test

4

3

3

4

14

4th test

3

2

3

4

12

5th test

Tesco Value Lemon Cheesecake 315g

A smooth baked cheesecake with a sweet meal biscuit base, topped with a tangy lemon sauceimage28.jpg

Ingredients

Name

Per Serving

Per 100g

Energy

755kJ (180 kcal)

1200kJ (290 kcal)

Protein

2.9g

4.6g

Carbohydrate

22.0g

34.9g

Sugars

13.4g

21.2g

Fat

8.9g

14.2g

Saturates

3.3g

5.2g

Mono unsaturated

3.9g

6.2g

Polyunsaturated

1.4g

2.2g

Fibre

3.2g

5.1g

Sodium

0.1g

0.1g

Biscuit Base (30%), Water, Glucose-Fructose Syrup, Skimmed Milk Soft Cheese (8%), Vegetable Oil, Yogurt (from Milk), Sugar, Lemon Juice (2.5%), Wheat Flour, Milk Proteins, Modified Maize Starch, Dried Egg, Malt dextrin, Modified Potato Starch, Gelling Agents (Pectin, Carrageenan, Carob Gum), Dried Glucose Syrup, Emulsifier (Mono- and Triglycerides of Fatty Acids), Dried Cream, Acidity Regulator (Citric Acid), Buttermilk Powder, Dried Skimmed Milk, Antioxidant (Calcium Lactate), Lactic Acid, Flavoring, Preservative (Potassium Sorbate), Colour (Curcumin)Biscuit Base contains: Sugar, Whole meal Wheat Flour, Vegetable Oil, Wheat Flour, Water, Partially Inverted Refiners Syrup, Raising Agents (Sodium Bicarbonate, Ammonium Bicarbonate), Salt, Emulsifier (Mono- and

Cheesecake Recipe

Base' Ingredients

6oz sweet, whole meal or digestive
or if appropriate, ginger biscuits
3oz melted butter


Method

Crush the biscuits in a plastic bag using a rolling pin.
Work them into the melted butter with a wooden spoon. Press the mixture into the base of a loose-bottomed tin; allow cooling and spooning cheesecake mixture on top.
Bases for Cheesecake may vary according to flavor and recipe.

Lemon Cheesecake Recipe

1 cup finely crushed Vanilla Wafers      3 Tbsp sugar
3 Tbsp butter or margarine, melted      4 eggs divided
3 pkg Cream Cheese, softened
1 cup sugar      3 Tbsp flour
1 Tbsp grated lemon peel      2 Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp vanilla      3/4 cup sugar
2 Tbsp cornstarch      1/4 cup lemon juice

Method
PREHEAT oven to 325°F if using a silver 9-inch spring form pan
(or to 300°F if using a dark non-stick 9-inch spring form pan).
Mix crumbs, 3 Tbsp. sugar and butter; press firmly onto bottom of pan. Bake 10 minutes.

SEPARATE 1 of the eggs. Cover and refrigerate egg yolk for later use. Set egg white aside. Beat cream cheese, 1-cup sugar, flour, lemon peel, 2 Tbsp. juice and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until well blended. Add egg white and remaining 3 whole eggs, one at a time, mixing on low speed after each addition just until blended. Pour over crust.

 Run knife or metal spatula around rim of pan to loosen cake; cool before removing rim of pan.
Refrigerate 4 hours or overnight.

MIX 3/4-cup sugar and cornstarch in medium saucepan, gradually stir in 1/2-cup water and 1/4-cup juice until well blended.
Bring just to boil on medium heat, stirring constantly,
cook and stir until clear and thickened.
Beat reserved egg yolk lightly with fork.
Stir in 2 Tbsp. of the hot cornstarch mixture.
Return to remaining cornstarch mixture in saucepan,
mix until well blended.
Cook 1 minute or until thickened, stirring constantly.
Cool slightly. Spoon topping over cheesecake,
refrigerate until set.

image29.jpg

Project Evaluation

For my project evaluation I had chosen to investigate convenience foods meals. And would be comparing the frozen/ready meals and the prepared meals comparing and trying to investigate which one of them is better for value cost health and also time saving. Looked at different dishes from Sweet dishes Deserts Main course meals and Snacks

I used a variety of methods for my research including primary research such as surveys, interviews and questionnaires also the secondary research will be from books, magazines, journals, leaflets and also the internet

I also looked at what convenience foods were the kind types that were being old in supermarkets, shops and groceries stores. Popularity? In my questionnaire I found out how popular they are? Nutritional content, information

Goimage28.jpgback image28.jpgto the primage28.jpgoduct contents

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