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Chocolate is good for you

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Introduction

How many of you have felt the urge to buy a huge bar of chocolate seen in the shop window, eaten a great piece of chocolate cake or have over indulged - especially at Christmas. This will be quite common to many of you and I would say that the majority of you would have felt fat or guilty afterwards. I have found some interesting facts that will hopefully help you enjoy the consumption of chocolate without that feeling of guilt afterwards. Chocolate comes in many forms from all over the world. "The seductive characteristics of chocolate can arouse the senses and send one's pulse racing to new heights." ...read more.

Middle

In a forty - gram serving of chocolate, there are 400 - milligrams of Flavonoids. These relax the inner surface of blood vessels, which is important to keep the blood pressure down and preventing hardening of the arteries. Also present in chocolate are phenylthylamines, which are a class of chemicals that contain amphetamines and ecstasy, which are stimulants. To get high on chocolate you would have to eat twenty-seven pounds at one sitting, not to be recommended! There are many myths and tales about chocolate we are told when we are young. A few myths seem to be quite popular. It is not true that chocolate causes acne or tooth decay (if you brush your teeth properly, that is); raises blood cholesterol levels; or is addictive (not in the same sense as nicotine, alcohol e.t.c.). ...read more.

Conclusion

Chocolate itself is not bad. Eating it will not adversely affect your health or put you at risk for any diseases or health problems. While it is rich in calories and saturated fat, moderate chocolate intake can be part of a healthy diet. What this means that if your diet is well balanced and healthy then occasionally indulging in chocolate is not a bad thing to do. Logically, if your main food is chocolate, it will be bad for you because you won't get enough of the various nutrients you need to maintain a level of good health. Hopefully this will relieve you of some of those guilty feelings. I have found an interesting and quick "Ten reasons for eating chocolate." (Taken from www.edelweisschocolates.com/ten_reasons.htm.) This can be used as a quick reference list, find out more by visiting the website written above. ...read more.

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