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Discussing the earthworm.

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Introduction

Earthworms The earthworm body is divided into ring-like segments. Some internal organs and the excretory organs are duplicated in each segment. Between segments 32 and 37 is the clitellum, a slightly bulged, discolored organ that produces a cocoon for enclosing the earthworm's eggs. The body is pointed at both ends, with the tail end the rounded of the two. ...read more.

Middle

Earthworms are hermaphroditic, they functional reproductive organs of both sexes occur in the same individual. The sperm of an individual earthworm fertilizes the eggs of another individual earthworm. During mating two earthworms are bound together by a sticky mucus while each transfers sperm to the other. The worms separate and form cocoons. The cocoon moves forward, picking up eggs and it picks ups the sperm deposited by the other earthworm. ...read more.

Conclusion

One Asian species is known to climb trees to escape drowning after heavy rainfall. Earthworms provide food for a large variety of birds and animals. Indirectly they provide food for man by their beneficial effects on plant growth. Earthworms aerate the soil; this promotes drainage, and then draws organic material into their burrows where it decomposes faster. This process produces more nutritive materials for growing plants. Earthworms also serve as fish bait this is where it's other name, angleworm, gets it name. ...read more.

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