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Investigating the refractive index of different types of transparent solids and to learn how density affects the refractive index.

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Introduction

Shai Manor Physics HL 22/10/2004 Planning Lab: Planning A: Aim: Investigating the refractive index of different types of transparent solids and to learn how density affects the refractive index. Hypothesis: Density will affect the refractive index in terms of making it "bigger or smaller". By this I mean it will make the angle at which it refracts bigger or smaller in relation to the glass used. This is because the denser the glass, the closer together the particles are packed. The closer they are packed, the more particles the light has to go through. Therefore, the higher the density, the slower the light goes through the glass. The slowing down of the light is the amount it refracts. I am thus expecting the speed of light to be slower through the glass. Variables: Independent: type of glass used Dependant: refractive index Controlled: Weighing scale, beaker, amount of water poured into beaker, lamp Planning B: Material: - 1 Weighing scale - 1L beaker - 3 different types of glass (Glass1= Green Glass)(Glass2= Milky Glass)(Glass3= Transparent Glass) ...read more.

Middle

- This is done by setting up the laboratory as follows: - A lamp, enlightening the glass at an angle. (For this experiment, an angle of 135� was used). Normal = 135-90 = 45� - An A4 paper under the glass, record the normal (line where light enters glass) - Record where the light is exiting the glass on the paper. - Measure the angle the light has come out from (angle between light exit and normal). 3. Now using the formula n= find n, the refractive index of all three glasses. Record the data in a table. Data Collection, Processing and Presentation: Density of glass: Glass 1 (green glass): Mass = 354.8 grams Volume = 850ml - 700ml = 150 ml = 150 cm� Density = Glass 2 (milky glass): Mass = 182.9 grams Volume = 850ml - 700ml = 150 ml = 150 cm� Density = Glass 3 (transparent glass): Mass = 187.0 grams Volume = 850ml - 700ml = 150 ml = 150 cm� Density = Glass 1 (Green) ...read more.

Conclusion

Conclusion & Evaluation: I can conclude the following: Glass I Density = High, Refractive Index = High, light Speed through glass = Slowest* Glass II Density = Medium, Refractive Index = Medium, Light Speed through glass = Slower** Glass III Density = Low, Refractive Index = low, Light Speed through glass = Slow*** * Slowest compared to real speed of light out of three glasses. ** Slower than glass 3, faster than glass 1. *** Slower than real speed of light, but faster than light through glass 1 and glass 2. When the light waves travel into the glass, its speed is decreased and its path is being bent towards the normal. Since the wave is slowing down, the wavelength is decreased. Therefore, my hypothesis was right; density did affect the refractive index; the higher the density was the higher the refractive index. Thus, the speed of light through the object slowed down. This has also been proven by Snell's Law. ...read more.

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