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Nutrition for Sport

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Introduction

Nutrition for Sport Carbohydrates The main function of carbohydrates is to provide the body with short energy storage. A secondary function is the halfway-term energy storage. Other carbohydrates are implicated as structural components in cells, for instance cellulose which is originate in the cell walls of plants. The main function of carbohydrates is to provide the body with energy. It does this in the form of glucose. It also helps with your brain to function properly; it also helps the nervous system and the red blood cells for the body's energy. The sources for carbohydrates are found in Breads, cereal grains, pasta, rice, fruit, vegetables, milk and sugar. Carbohydrates are broken down into different sections; these are monosaccharides, disaccharides and polysaccharides. Monosaccharide The three common sugars found in monosaccharides shame the same molecular formula C6H12O6. Because of their six atoms these are called Hexose. Glucose- "Blood sugar", the immediate source of energy for cellular respiration. Galactose- a sugar in milk and yogurt. Fructose- a sugar found in honey. Disaccharides Three common disaccharides: Sucrose- Common table sugar Lactose- Major Sugar in milk Maltose- Product of starch digestion A process called condensation can join two monosaccharides together. Hydrolysis is the reverse of the reaction (add water). Polysaccharides Polysaccharides have two basic functions, they serve for monosaccharide storage and they serve as structural components. In their monosaccharide storage capacity, polysaccharides are huge assemblies of monosaccharides. ...read more.

Middle

Vitamins Vitamin Name Function Source RDI Deficiency A Help maintain good vision, healthy skin and mucus membranes Liver, milk products and mackerel 5000 iu (International units) N/A Beta carotene Super antioxidant and is found in plants Sweet potatoes, carrots, cantaloupe, spinach and other dark leafy veg 5 to 15mg or 10000 to 25000iu Night blindness, impaired growth and dry skin B-1 (Thiamine) Converts food to energy, aids the nervous and cardiovascular system Whole meal bread and Soya beans 1.5mg N/A B-2 Helps in growth reproduction. Helps to metabolise fats, carbs and proteins. Promotes healthy skin hairs Milk, liver, kidneys, yeast, cheese, leafy green veg, fish and eggs 1.7mg N/A B-3 (Niacin) Keeps nervous system balanced, synthesis of sex hormones, thyroxide, cortisone and insulin Poultry fish, peanuts, marmite, rice, bran and wheat germ 20mg N/A B-5 (Pantothenic acid) Helps in cell building and maintaining normal growth and development of the central nervous system. Helps form hormones and antibodies Wheat germ, green veg. Whole grains, mushrooms, fish and peanut 10mg N/A B-6 (Pyridoxine) Helps in the utilization of proteins and metabolism of fats. Needed for the production of red blood cells and antibodies Wheat germ, green veg. Whole grains, mushrooms, fish marmite and peanut 2mg Anaemia, fatigue, dry or rough skin, immune system problems C (Ascorbic acid) Formation of collagen, strengthens tissues, helps in healing, fighting infection and regulates cholesterol, helps to absorb iron Most fresh fruit and veg 60mg Bleeding gums, bruise easily, dental cavities, low infection resistance and slow healing of wounds D (Calciferol) ...read more.

Conclusion

If you do not have the right diet when you are young, then you could not have the required amount of nutrients needed to keep fit and healthy. Reports have shown that children eat the same a their parents, when it is not always good for them, because the adult could be having a diet in saturated fats and this would be bad for a child, because it would make them obese. An adults diet is very different to a babies diet because an adult needs more intake of food and there food in hard foods for example roast pork with chips, whereas babies tend to have more of a liquid diet because they cant chew food like adults. Lifestyle Nowadays our diets have changed significantly over the years- today we have the largest range of foods available to us, but we are choosing to eat foods high in saturated fats and simple carbohydrates. Fast-food restaurants are flourishing because they are used so regularly by our society. As a result of the sedentary lifestyle and diet choices there is now a huge rise in obesity and other forms of ill health. (J.Chance) Sports type A marathon runners diet is very different to a boxers diet because, a marathon runner will eat a lot of carbohydrates, whereas a boxer will eat a lot more of protein for muscle bulk. The carbohydrates give the marathon runner long lasting aerobic energy, whereas a boxer needs protein to withstand long matches where they need there muscles to punch. ?? ?? ?? ?? James Parkinson - 1 - ...read more.

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