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Summary of Ruminants Nutrient content of herbivores' food is low and high propotion of it is difficult to digest because the present of large amount of cellulose.

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Introduction

Summary of Ruminants Nutrient content of herbivores' food is low and high propotion of it is difficult to digest because the present of large amount of cellulose. A powerful carbohydrase, cellulase, is needed to break down cellulose to monosaccharides. However, cellulase is extremely rare and can be only produce by micro-organisms. Ruminants mammals like cow have an enlarged stomach of 4 chambers, the rumen, the reticulum, the omasum and the abomasum. ...read more.

Middle

The rumen is an anaerobic fermenting chamber and break down cellulose into ethanoic, propionic and butyric acids with evolution of carbon dioxide and methane gas which are released from the digestive tract. The contents of the rumen then pass through the omasum into the abomasum and to the duodenum where the soluble products of digestion are absorbed. ...read more.

Conclusion

Urea is added to cattle feed to further supplement the source of protein. In non-ruminant herbivorous mammals, they also posses fermentation chambers in caecum and appendix. However, having a fermentation chamber near the end of the gut does not able the food to be regurgitated and the products of digestion cannot be shunted forwards into the small intestine efficiently for absorption to take place. Coprophagy refers to the phenomenon that hares and rabbits reingest their own faeces . ...read more.

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