• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

“Look again at ‘Shall I Compare Thee….?’ By William Shakespeare, compare this poem with one other of your choice”

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Stephen Kent 17/5/02 "Look again at 'Shall I Compare Thee....?' By William Shakespeare, compare this poem with one other of your choice" In this essay I will be comparing "Shall I Compare Thee...?", and "The Flea", by John Donne. These two poets both have the same ambition; they are trying to get a woman. Shakespeare is trying to earn the women's love and respect, while Donne is just trying to get the women into bed. The main difference between these two poems is that "Shall I Compare Thee...?", is a love poem and "The Flea", is not. William Shakespeare wrote more than 150 sonnets, one of them being "Shall I Compare Thee...?". This poem is very rhythmic giving it a sort of a love poem feeling. ...read more.

Middle

Shakespeare used a lot better known loving imagery such as heaven, summers day, darling buds of may etc. But Donne uses strange images such as Flea, Sucks, murder, and death to complete his lighthearted objective to have sex with her. Shakespeare uses his imagery "a summers day" to describe the beautiful women, and Donne uses the flea as a guilt trip for the women saying that the flea has sucked your blood which is more than what I've done. Each poem has got an extended metaphor; in "The Flea" the Flea meaning love is it. In "Shall I Compare Thee...?" a summers day is the extended metaphor meaning the woman's beauty. Donne defiantly uses more of an unpleasant way to get his point across. ...read more.

Conclusion

"The Flea" uses a lot of words with a sexual and religious significance such suck'd, Sins, swells as in the sexual organs swelling, and temple. The words sucked and swells are again using a sexual influence on the women if she reads this poem. Shakespeare ensures the lady by saying "eternall lines to time" which I think means that he will never leave her. Although both of these poems are about getting a woman I think they are totally different in the structure, the language used and how they put their point across. I think the poems show Shakespeare is the gentleman out of the two of them; he uses more of a kind and pleasant language. Donne uses the one word you wouldn't expect in a poem to get a woman, that word is "Flea". ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Other Shakespeare Plays section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Other Shakespeare Plays essays

  1. Shakespeare as a Real Man in Shakespeare in Love

    Which is not to say that the economic forces are not important. Note that Wessex needs money for his plantations and is willing to trade his title for capital gotten through marriage; Henslowe needs money to run his theatre and is willing to rip off his own playwright and actors

  2. William Shakespeare and his life.

    William is thought to have written the play Henry IV, Part Two and Shakespeare's reputation as an actor is confirmed his performance in Ben Jonson's Every Man in his Humor which clearly lists his name as a principal actor in the London play.

  1. Discussing the Works of Shakespeare.

    In them he used his poetic idiom as an extremely supple dramatic instrument, capable of recording human thought and the many dimensions of given dramatic situations. Hamlet (1601?), perhaps his most famous play, exceeds by far most other tragedies of revenge in picturing the mingled sordidness and glory of the human condition.

  2. EN2372 Shakespeare:

    Through Iago's sadistic manipulation we watch this 'unbookish'13 yet 'warlike'14 man, who is respected and admired by many, fall into deep decline. When we first meet this warrior, such remarks as: "Keep up your bright swords, for the due will rust them" (1:2:58)15 cannot fail to impress.

  1. "The Life of the Great William Shakespeare"

    Pericles, Prince of Tyre (1608), Cymbeline (1610), and The Winter's Tale (1611), were his last complete plays. While using a humorous atmosphere, Shakespeare stages the dramatic plots, creating a mixture of two of his best types of plays. Besides containing the least amount of Shakespeare's works, it also contains the most controversial.

  2. Critical Approaches to Shakespeare: Some Initial Observations.

    A dramatic script by Shakespeare has no single determinate meaning. Rather, it contains a range of possible interpretative meanings. Our job as interpreters is to explore some of these possibilities, to evaluate them with respect to each other, and, if possible, to come to a sense of some of the major alternatives.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work