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Coursework Question: Discuss how successfully 'Twelve Angry Men' works as a thriller despite the limitations of setting and ch

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Introduction

Coursework Question: Discuss how successfully 'Twelve Angry Men' works as a thriller despite the limitations of setting and character. 'Twelve Angry Men' is a gripping thriller despite the limitations of the film. The black and white 1957 film is packed with suspense even though the film has many restrictions in it. These limitations are things such the setting, the action/special effects, the props, the lack of costume changes, the cast are all twelve middle aged unattractive white men and finally the plot of the film is quite dull and uninteresting. Regardless of these limitations the director, Sidney Lumet, still makes it an exciting thriller by focusing the film on interesting memorable characters with different personalities and back grounds. By being extremely original with his ideas, by creating tension with the setting- makes a claustrophobic effect, by getting the audience involved and thinking on the plot of the jury decision because it judges on the life of a teenage boy and finally by making a wide range of camera shots. On paper 'Twelve Angry Men' would sound like a very dull film. To bring the film to life it needs a great cast of actors which 'Twelve Angry Men' has. The film is full of realistic unforgettable characters that all have different personalities and backgrounds. There are four dominant characters in the film, juror no.3- Lee J. ...read more.

Middle

This is an important stage in the case because juror no.4 who is very intelligent and who hardly ever gets intimidated has started to look vulnerable and so to therefore do all the jurors who voted guilty. Juror no.4 is an appreciative man, he admired juror no.8's intelligent points on the case, 'you've made some excellent points, but I still think the boy is guilty because...', this shows juror no.4's maturity. Near the end he changes his opinion to 'not guilty' when he has enough doubt in his mind about the boy being guilty. By far the most important character in the film is juror no.8, played by Henry Fonda. He is a very brave, courageous and intelligent character. The audience realised juror no.8 was like no other juror very early in the film when he was the only juror to vote 'not guilty'. Also he was the only actor in the jury room who was wearing a white suit making him stand out and even making him seem rather angelic in some ways. At first juror no.8 was very laid back with his ideas on why the boy wasn't guilty, he was very criticised, provoked and even hated by some of the other jurors especially juror no.3. Tolerating all the mocking that he received from some of the aggressive jurors, he still was able to keep his calmness and one by one he changed everyone's vote to 'not guilty' by intelligent facts about the case. ...read more.

Conclusion

The camera does an establishing shot, the audience are only able to see the back of juror no.8 and are able to see every other juror staring surprisingly at juror no.8. This makes juror no.8 feel as if he is an outsider and that all the other jurors are against him. The plot of 'Twelve angry Men' is partly one of the reasons of why it is a successful thriller. The film has a very interesting original plot, it is interesting because the events which happen in the film judge on the life or death of a teenage boy who is either guilty or innocent. This creates suspense. The audience all want justice for the boy because the film has made the audience feel sensitive and has made the audience actually care on the final jury decision. 'Twelve Angry Men' works well as a thriller despite the limitations of setting, storyline and characters. Regardless of these limitations the director, Sidney Lumet, still makes it an exciting thriller by focusing the film on interesting memorable characters with different personalities and back grounds, being extremely original with his ideas, creating tension with the setting- makes a claustrophobic effect, getting the audience involved and thinking, on the plot of the jury decision because it judges on the life of a teenage boy and finally by making a wide range of camera shots. ...read more.

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