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‘A Christmas Carol’ combines a number of different elements to create the classic Christmas tale.

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Introduction

'A Christmas Carol' combines a number of different elements to create the classic Christmas tale. 'A Christmas Carol' combines many different ideas, which is one of the reasons that 'A Christmas Carol' is a classic. This book introduced the concept of Christmas, as we now know it. The festivities, the food, the merriment, the joy and spirit of Christmas is brought out and made alive. This appeals to both old and young alike As the basis of 'A Christmas Carol' is to be a ghost story, this attracts people to the book as many love to be scared. Though the story is light hearted, there are subtle observations made by Charles Dickens of Victorian life and politics, in the form of satire. The Joy of Christmas Tradition. Before Dickens wrote 'A Christmas Carol', Christmas was not celebrated in the way that it is now; it was more or less thought of as just a religious affair. Dickens in a way reinvented the whole Christmas 'idea' by describing ways in which we can celebrate, for example the Fezziwig parties. "...there were more dances, and there were forfeits, and more dances, and then there was cake..." Christmas comes alive with 'A Christmas Carol', it is described with frivolous antics, joyful doings and happy, good spirited people. ...read more.

Middle

All of these things are scary, but Dickens elevated their scariness by using melodrama and making them seem humorous at times. The Victorian audience would most likely have found the tale highly gory and frightening. Some might scoff and say why read it, but there is something in human nature, which loves to be scared but not directly. Dickens used this to captivate his readers. He used eerie tensions and the silent Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come to create such an atmosphere that you cannot help but feel compelled to read on. "Quiet and dark, beside him stood the phantom, with its outstretched hand." The satirical element. Dickens attacks the Victorian take on poverty and the harsh living conditions that the poor had to endure. He uses satire to express how he feels about the attitudes towards these issues and to show how he thinks they should be tackled. Dickens also attacks the complacency and coldness of the time. Satire is hard to pinpoint into a quote because of its subtleness. However, a good example of satire in 'A Christmas Carol' is when the two portly gentle ask for donation from Scrooge and Scrooge refuses. Dickens mentions the prisons, workhouses, the Treadmill and Poor Law, whish were used to keep the poor from the streets and to make them work for little or no money. ...read more.

Conclusion

I should like to have given him something: that's all.'" Dickens also uses the idea of inherent goodness, that everyone is born good, but they just get a little lost on the way. That with a little nudge, or large, we can all revert to the right path. Scrooge started off as good as any other and he needed that nudge later on in life. "Scrooge, heated by the remarks, and speaking unconsciously like his former, not his latter self." Another point, which makes 'A Christmas Carol', a heart-warming tale is that Tiny Tim lives! Tiny Tim is a poor crippled boy, almost on his last wing. "Alas for Tiny Tim, he bore a little crutch, and has his limbs supported by an iron frame!" If Tiny Tim were to die then the ideas of redemption and change would not work to their full potential. This is because Scrooge must give to save Tiny Tim's life, so that the story may end on a happy note. "...to Tiny Tim, who did NOT die," Scrooge "...was a second father." Changing and becoming good is quite simply a great thing as Scrooge found out, as did all those who knew and came to know him. "I am as light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a schoolboy, I am as giddy as a drunken man." ...read more.

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