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“Follower” and “Digging” By Seamus Heaney - What do we learn about Seamus Heaney’s attitude to his father in the two poems?

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Introduction

GCSE ASSIGNMENT: "Follower" and "Digging" By Seamus Heaney What do we learn about Seamus Heaney's attitude to his father in the two poems? Seamus Heaney was born on 13 April 1939 in county Derry, Northern Ireland. He grew up in a farm and was one of the nine children. He is well educated, having attained a first English at Queen's college, Belfast.Heaney now has become one of the famous poets. The poet poems writes are often taken place in Ireland. The poems that I am going to compare in the following text, are "Follower" and "Digging. These two poems are also set in Ireland and are both about his father. Seamus Heaney was an adult when he wrote the poems "Digging" and "Follower". Seamus Heaney has put time shifts in the poem but not exactly in the same positions. In the poem "Follower" Seamus Heaney starts with the past tense. ...read more.

Middle

They are also both about his father. Heaney describes his father by using the terms, "Nicking and slicing neatly heaving sods." The reason why he uses the phrases above, because in this way he describes how his father and grandfather were both trained and experienced well. The better way to describe them are refined, neatly and precise. In the poems, SeamusHeaney describes his father as a strong, muscular farmer. In the poem "Follower" he compares his father with horses and saying that they work as a team. ("The sweating team turned round.") Where as in the poem "Digging" he says that his father's knee was levered firmly, which means his firm grasp or push is one with controlled force or pressure. Seamus Heaney uses the words "squelch" and "slap" because squelch is full of water, therefore it's good to describe the potatoes. Heaney uses the words "slap" because as he puts the potatoes on the side it makes a slapping sound, In the poem "Digging" and "Follower" Heaney uses the devices alliteration, imagery, onomatophao, assonance and rhyme. ...read more.

Conclusion

Seamus Heaney has used assonance in both poems. In the poem "Follower" he has used many assonance. ("Tripping. Falling"). He has used "Tripping and Falling" because this describes Seamus Heaney's father is now "Tripping and Falling" behind him. Also in the poem "Digging" he describes the spade, as it is in to the ground, in an assonance way, example- gravely, grand. In my opinion my most favourable poem is "Follower" by Seamus Heaney. This is because I understand this poem better than the poem "Digging". In this case, I believe that each word from the poem "Follower", I understand from the bottom of my heart. I think Heaney has let down his father. This is because Heaney was the oldest from the nine children and Heaney's father had a lot of faith on Heaney. When Heaney was young he used to follow the footsteps of his father but then Heaney let down his father. Then again, Heaney had given all the faith back to his father because, now he is one of the famous poet!!! Mishal Noor Mohammed ...read more.

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