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1984 by George Orwell is a story of a man's struggle against a totalitarian government that controls the ideas and thoughts of its citizens. They use advanced mind reading techniques to discover the thoughts

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Introduction

Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) - Struggle Against Totalitarian Government 1984 by George Orwell is a story of a man's struggle against a totalitarian government that controls the ideas and thoughts of its citizens. They use advanced mind reading techniques to discover the thoughts of the people and punish those who show signs of rebellion against the government. The novel is supposed to be a prophetic story, however, it was somewhat wrong in predicting the date when this government will rein. Although some of the themes described in the book are already a reality, some are not going to happen for some time to come. ...read more.

Middle

The government itself was very mysterious and had several parts that were very suspicious to the main character, Winston, who worked in one part of the government. It was divided up into four parts. The Ministry of Truth, where Winston worked, was in charge of education and the arts. The Ministry of Peace, which was in command of war. The Ministry of plenty, which controlled economic affairs. And finally the Ministry of Love, which concerned itself with law and order. Orwell also uses description of technology to show how the government controlled its' citizens. He constantly refers to telescreens that are in all areas and even in homes. ...read more.

Conclusion

He used excellent description of places, events and people that I can't even attempt to repeat. He used the prospective of several different people through Winston's interaction of them, and their discussions. He also used his imagination extremely well to describe the technology that is used to control the people of the world. Even today we are making things that Orwell described like the telescreens. He also used comparisons of the real world to the world of his story. The image of Emmanual Goldstein was an excellent likness to Hitler. Along with the large numbers of countries that join together to form an alliance for a common good, similar to the United Nations or NATO. It is in this way that we can better understand what the author was saying and the idea that he wanted to convey. ...read more.

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