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How Effective Is Part 1 As An Opening To The Novel 1984 By George Orwell? In the First couple of pages, George Orwell's 1984 gives off a very luring and taming effect of getting the readers attention. There are also a lot of strong themes introduced in part 1 of 1984 such as; Mystery, Uncertainty and subtle suspense. The superior Big Brother's goal is to turn ordinary people into a thoughtless working machines. The Party also punishes those who oppose as a threat to the Party. Simple human desires were revoked and human instincts were made to look dirty and ugly. The first theme to be introduced was the controlled society and invasion of privacy by everyone and everything. The Party uses public tele-screens to announce new information and perform the "two minutes hate", which is where people would express their anger at the screen. They also used large intimidating posters as a slogan. ...read more.


The language "Newspeak" introduced in Part 1, was forced by the party meaning that nobody can express themselves and therefore cannot even say or think anything rebellious about the party. "By 2050 earlier, probably all real knowledge of Oldspeak will have disappeared. The whole literature of the past will have been destroyed. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Byron they'll exist only in Newspeak versions, not merely changed into something different, but actually contradictory of what they used to be. Even the literature of the Party will change. Even the slogans will change. How could you have a slogan like "freedom is slavery" when the concept of freedom has been abolished? The whole climate of thought will be different. In fact there will be no thought, as we understand it now. Orthodoxy means not thinking - not needing to think. Orthodoxy is unconsciousness." What the underlying statement of Newspeak prolongs is that by destructing the words that would describe what someone would want to say, they wouldn't be able to think either. ...read more.


In the opening chapters, the distinct dystopian theme was made very clear from the first page as such. "On each landing, opposite the lift shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption ran beneath it." To conclude, Part 1 of 1984 is a very effective beginning of the book, introducing some powerful and interesting themes; Newspeak, Invasion of Privacy, Human rights and Dystopia. The opening in my opinion was very successful, as after reading the first chapter, I felt almost opposed to read on. Also at the end of Part 1 we are left on a high where Winston has fallen in love. Orwell cleverly leaves the end of Part 1 mysteriously uncompleted, perhaps to be knocked down? But the main point is that, from the readers point of view, very attached to the book and intrigued to read on. ...read more.

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