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19th & 20th Century Birds of Poetry - The eagle is a poem with two verses made up of three lines each, so it is a very short poem compared to the Hawk, which has five verses, made up of four lines each.

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Introduction

19th & 20th Century Birds of Poetry The eagle is a poem with two verses made up of three lines each, so it is a very short poem compared to the Hawk, which has five verses, made up of four lines each. Alliteration is used in the Hawk although a lot more in the in the Eagle were there are three examples in the first line (Clasps, Crag, Crooked) and two in the second (Lovely, Lands). In the Hawk Roosting there're few examples of alliteration one in verse one, line three (Hooked, Head) the next in verse five with (arguments, assert,) Rhyme is not used much in the Hawk Roosting but more than the alliteration for example feet, eat in verse one. In verse two trees, bouncy, me. ...read more.

Middle

This does not give me the impression of a god or a magnificent being, just of an animal evolved to kill and this is exactly what it says in verse three lines two and three "It took the whole of creation, to produce my foot, my each feather". It also shows or tells us of arrogant the hawk is. This is stated in verse three line four "Now I hold creation in my foot". This means that he decides which parts of creation may live or die. This is bluntly stated at the beginning of verse five "The allotment of Death", simply meaning that he chooses what dies. At the end of that verse, the writer says, "No arguments assert my right". This means there are no discussions or arguments, it is his right to kill what he chooses and nothing is going to change that. ...read more.

Conclusion

In "The Eagle" there are little or no unusual words except for azure in line three verse one. I think 20th century poets tend to use less rhyme schemes and rhythms in their poems but use unusual words and alliteration. For in the "Hawk Roosting" there is not much rhyme and barely any rhythm. Were as in "The Eagle" there is a definite rhyme scheme and rhythm there is also more imagery used in "The Eagle" for example" the wrinkled sea beneath him crawls" line one, verse two. This again emphasizing the god likeness and how the sea should must crawl beneath him almost subservient, another is "And like a thunderbolt he falls" this gives the impression of a god, like the god of thunder throwing a thunderbolt down to earth. So in conclusion from these two poems I would say 20th century poems concentrate more on word choice and alliteration to give the affect were as 19th century use rhyme rhythm and imagery ...read more.

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