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A Biographical Analysis of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

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Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� :<����9�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0W5bjbj�2�2 (@�X�X�*���������������8< H�vpppppppp$ReB�pppppB��ppW���p�p�p�p������pd �(�l��p@�m0��e �:e ��4�"����e �� pp�pppppBB�A Biographical Analysis of �The Rime of the Ancient Mariner �The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,� by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, is a somewhat lengthy poem concerning the paranormal activities of a sea mariner and his crew. The work was constructed to be the beginning piece in Lyrical Ballads, a two-volume set written by William Wordsworth and Coleridge. Wordsworth intended to, in his volume, make the ordinary seem extraordinary, while Coleridge aimed to make the extraordinary ordinary. �The Rime� was first published in 1798. Despite the current popularity of the piece, it was harshly criticized upon being first published. One of �The Rime�s� toughest opponents was Wordsworth himself, who claimed that the poem had �neither characterization nor proper agency nor skill in the handling of imagery� (Fry, 12). Wordsworth even bluntly described the piece as being in the wrong overall meter (Fry, 12). Because of these presumed flaws, �The Rime� was edited into several subsequent editions, being released in 1800, 1802, 1805, 1817, and 1834. When a reader examines �the Rime,� the piece first appears to be merely that of an archaic ghost story. ...read more.

Middle

Samuel returned to Cambridge, but failed to earn a degree (Fry, 4). The writer next traveled to Oxford and eventually Bristol (Fry, 4). While in Bristol, he met Sara Fricker and was soon married (Fry, 4). With his newfound bride, Coleridge traveled to Clevedon (Fry, 4). Despite now having a wife, Samuel still frequently drifted from location to location. During his drifting in 1796, Coleridge began the use of laudanum, which eventually led to his addiction to opium (Fry, 5). In the years to follow, Samuel would repeatedly take lengthy trips with his friends, often leaving his wife and children at home. One of these lengthy trips was a tour of Germany, which Coleridge underwent with William and Dorothy Wordsworth in hopes of gathering inspirational information for his master opus (Fry, 6). Samuel would, as a result of these frequent tours, become estranged from his wife and family. Coleridge chose to continue his trips, and eventually separated from Sara, his longtime wife. After the split, the writer went on to suffer from a chronic opium addiction. The stresses that this habit placed on the author caused many of his friends to distant themselves from Coleridge, including the Wordsworths (Fry, 7). ...read more.

Conclusion

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