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"A Christmas Carol" as an Allegory.

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Introduction

"A Christmas Carol" as an Allegory I read and studied "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens. Dickens was born on the 7th of February 1812 at Portsea in Hampshire. He had eight brothers and sisters who all lived with their parents, John and Elizabeth Dickens. John Dickens worked in a series of different places and had to constantly move houses to avoid paying his debts. However, these were probably the high points of Charles' childhood as they were soon shipped back to London where his father's debts became worse. Charles had to leave school early and work to try and help his dad's financial problems. Nevertheless, John Dickens was arrested and sent to Marshalsea, a prison for debtors, and soon after, the rest of the family followed him. As John's mother died in 1824, they were released from prison but spent the rest of their lives worrying about returning there. Charles resumed his school education and achieved the role of a clerk for a solicitor. Charles started his writing career by publishing short stories in local magazines and newspapers. It wasn't until the 1840s that he started writing "A Christmas Carol". ...read more.

Middle

Instead of listening to Fred, he tells him to "Keep Christmas in your own way." Fred can clearly be seen to symbolise happiness because even though he is not rich and does not have much to spend, he is still joyful and merry at Christmas time. In stave one of the novel, two charity workers enter the scene and ask Scrooge to spare some change for the poor at that specific time of year. However, he dismisses them by asking if the prisons and workhouses were still in use. The charity workers try to come back at him by reminding him of the dreadful conditions of these accommodations but all he says is "Oh, I was afraid that something had occurred to stop them in their usual course" The poor are living in very deprived conditions. These are shown when Dickens is describing Scrooge near the very start. It is here that Dickens makes the remark that "No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle". This is Dickens' way of saying that there were homeless people living on the streets, without disclosing it directly. "Are there no prisons?" "No Union workhouses?" ...read more.

Conclusion

The spirit is said to be "shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible, save one outstretched hand." This description portrays the ghost as being gloomy and mysterious. The spirit reveals how things will turn out if Scrooge does not change. He shows Scrooge the death of a young, helpless child, Bob Cratchit's son, Tiny Tim. He also shows him what things will be like after he dies if he doesn't change. This ghost shows what people thought of Scrooge too. "He frightened every one away from him when he was alive, to profit us when he was dead." Others were pleased about his death. "It was a happier house for this man's death!" There are some men talking in the street about Scrooge's death. One said, "What has he done with his money." "I haven't heard," replied the other "Left it to his company, perhaps. He hasn't left it to me. That's all I know." These comments just go to show how much the general public despised Scrooge. Dickens uses the three spirits to go through his life and show the real Ebenezer Scrooge, not the grumpy, rich and sinful one. He also wants to show that inside every typical rich human being, there is a true person; it just takes something to bring it out. ...read more.

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