• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Comparison of London by William Blake and Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A Comparison of "London" by William Blake and "Ozymandias" by Percy Bysshe Shelley Essay By Ozhan O'Sullivan This essay compares two poems, "London" by William Blake, and "Ozymandias" by Percy Bysshe Shelley. Both writers were very romantic, heavily influenced by the revolutionary ideas and rapidly changing social and political values of the late 18th and early 19th century. Similarities Themes A theme of Mortality lives in both poems. In "London" Blake talks about the death and suffering of people, and in "Ozymandias" Shelley talks about the death of a civilisation. A sense of someone dominating, someone with greater power occurs in both poems. In "London" the rich have this upper hand against the poor, in "Ozymandias" this great leader is said to have this strength over his enemies and his own people. ...read more.

Middle

Moods The two poems, both give a feeling of depression and melancholy to the reader. Shelley uses different words to create this effect, while Blake writes how everyone is sad and weak. Great arrogance is shown in both poems. In "Ozymandias" the king shows that he is arrogant, he describes himself on the pedestal, he talks about how great and powerful ruler he is. In "London" the arrogance of the church compares to this. In "London" the rich betray the poor, because they have put their name on everything. In "Ozymandias" the sculptor betrays the king when the statue is being made. Styles Both poems have phonological techniques like alliteration, rhyme and onomatopoeia. ...read more.

Conclusion

The strength of authority is maintained in "London" while in "Ozymandias" it has dissipated. Moods "Ozymandias" fills you with mystery about where the traveller came from, and what happened to Ozymandias's great civilisation, while in "London" Blake makes the poem mundane and bleak. "Ozymandias" is a very optimistic poem; Shelley writes about how great the leader is, while in "London" Blake expresses the city as a place of unhappiness, he does not write about any good things about London, only bad, the poem is left pessimistic. Styles Shelley writes "Ozymandias" in an archaic language, while Blake's "London" is more modern. Shelley's "Ozymandias" is a sonnet, while "London" uses repeating stanzas that help to keep the rhythm, and to separate the different points made. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Blake section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Blake essays

  1. 'Modernist writers disturbed their readers by adopting complex and difficult new forms and styles'. ...

    Conversely, people must have some hope of achieving their ideal, or life would become futile. Woolf's symbol of the lighthouse expresses this paradoxical idea in that it represents both an idealised fantasy while also being a real lighthouse. It becomes a trigger, provoking the reader to think about the human

  2. A comparison between Jean Rhys and Una Marson

    to challenge established notions of Self, gender and race within the colonial structure. But essential to their experience is their struggle. Naipaul recognised, in Rhys, the themes of "isolation, an absence of society or community, the sense of things falling apart, dependence, loss".4 This could also be said of Marson.

  1. Essay of Comparison between

    poem or playground chant, until you remember that Blake could not have known these as he did not attend school. The reader would think this because of the simple vocabulary, and also if you notice, the poem uses soft alliteration -- "little lamb" -- this gave a much softer feel

  2. Gender, Authority and Dissent in English Mystical Writers - Is Margery Kempe a mystic?

    She seeks justification for her mystical standing by linking herself closely to others and, though illiterate receives much of her inspiration from such mystical texts as 'Incendium Amoris', 'Stimulus Amoris', and Walter Hilton's 'Scale of Perfection'. However, as Glasscoe has pointed out, her spiritual experiences were not an easy thing for Kempe to meditate on.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work