• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Comparison of Broadsheet and Tabloid Newspapers

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A comparison of broadsheet and tabloid newspapers Newspapers started being produced in Britain during the 17th Century. Over the years they have become one of the most popular ways of receiving information. General interest newspapers often feature articles on political events, crime, business, art/entertainment, society and sports. People read them to find out what is going on in the world. Even though television and the Internet is now a big part of the media, newspapers are still one of the most common ways of getting information. Newspapers can be daily or weekly and they give up to date information on the types of stories the reader is interested in. Newspapers can be accurate and factual but they can be exaggerated and unreliable depending on which type you read. Newspapers are separated into two types, tabloid and broadsheet. The tabloids and broadsheets are two very different types of newspapers in lots of ways. ...read more.

Middle

Tabloids tend to have a single story dominated by a headline, broadsheets allow two or more stories to be displayed, the most important at the top of the page. Inside a tabloid newspaper the pictures tend to dominate more than the text as opposed to the broadsheet newspaper where the text is usually bigger than the picture, especially in the main stories. A further contrast between broadsheets and tabloids is the language in both the headline and the text. In a tabloid the headlines are a very important factor of the articles. The aim is to create an interesting, clever headline by using techniques such as rhyming, alliteration or a pun. For example 'ROSS AND RUSS SUSPENDED' was a recent headline in the Sun newspaper. This shows alliteration to make the two names similar creating a clever, catchy headline. The headlines are often in capitals and are nearly always very big and bold to make the stories eye-catching. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the contrary broadsheets are there to inform rather than provoke emotions and so will use detail in their text. Long, complex and detailed sentences are a common occurrence. Broadsheet newspapers use a factual and formal tone in their articles. 'The BBC could face prosecution over obscene phone calls that Jonathan Ross and Russell Brand made to 78-year-old Fawlty Towers actor Andrew Sachs' is the opening line of the broadsheet article in the Daily Mail. The language is a lot more factual and informing, not over-exaggerating. The sentence generalizes what the article is going to be about. In my opinion a tabloid is a much more preferable read. This is because I personally enjoy a more exciting, lighter read than a serious one. I think many younger people prefer tabloids as they are not yet interested in politics and financial issues. My opinion is that in the future I might prefer to read broadsheets as I will be more mature and will want to know more about the type of information written in broadsheets. Ella Park English Coursework Ms Uren ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Writing to Inform, Explain and Describe section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Writing to Inform, Explain and Describe essays

  1. Comparison of a Broadsheet and Tabloid paper

    On the morning of September 11, 2001, nineteen terrorists affiliated with al-Qaeda hijacked four commercial passenger jet airliners. The hijackers crashed two of the airliners into the World Trade Center in New York City - one plane into each tower.

  2. Compare and contrast the features of a tabloid and broadsheet newspaper. Consider the ...

    I took an article from a tabloid newspaper to see how many words have three or more syllables and one or two syllables and here are the results - Daily Mirror on the 12th September 2007 - words with one or two syllables - 45, words with three or more syllables - 6.

  1. Analyse how information is presented in Tabloid and Broadsheet Newspapers

    The picture was very sensationalist as was the language and so the two complemented each other perfectly. This use of pictures to complement articles by giving the reader an insight on the article subject is common practice by both Tabloids and Broadsheets.

  2. Comparison of Broadsheet and Tabloid

    This political stance emphasizes freedom of speech, as the previous nickname for the newspaper was 'the paper of the people'. However, despite the traditional stance, some tabloid newspapers support the conservative party, therefore, this equalises 'The Guardian' to this minority that chiefly support the right-wing end of the political spectrum as being pro-conservative.

  1. Some Aspects Of Sports Coverage In Newspapers

    In both types of newspaper, the sports that are played annually are covered more, and women's sports receive a very low amount of coverage, if any, except for in large events such as the Olympics or World Cup. Certain sports such as football get huge amounts of coverage in Tabloids and Broadsheets.

  2. Media Advert Comparison

    Not much detail is in the text so that we can quickly read the lists on the cows, this means that the point given from the advert can be taken in quickly and easily this will be good as the target audience can read the article even if there in a rush.

  1. Willy Russel

    I like them because Linda represent the feminism, by that I mean that in the play she's changing, she's becoming a women and the audience can follow her in her growth: "I've got mud all over me shoes". She acts like a teenage girl not like a young girl like she used to be.

  2. short stories coursework

    so creates a sense of horror when he is the first to suffer. Although Sergeant-Major Morris did give the paw to Mr White he tried to warn him on many occasions about the dangers which might befall the bearer of the paw and I therefore feel some compassion towards him.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work