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A comparison of 'Easy' by Andrew Fusek Peters with Andrew Marvell's 'To his Coy Mistress'.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

December 13th Comparison of Poems W.J.E.C. COURSEWORK Pre 20th Century Writing A comparison of 'Easy' by Andrew Fusek Peters with Andrew Marvell's 'To his Coy Mistress'. After reading the two poems in detail and after doing group analysis the following points were brought up for a further evaluation. These were: theme, ideas, language, imagery and personal opinion. Both poems deal with seduction and relationships but vary of how it is done. In the poem 'Easy', SEX seemed to be the biggest issue. The relationship here was more of a 'one time fling' or a 'one night stand' type of relationship where the characters only pursue love of a sexual nature and nothing more. As we have seen later in the poem, one member of this relationship is always left distraught. They are left to feel worthless, with an extremely low self-esteem. Although with 'To his Coy Mistress', there seemed to be love set on a different plateau as admiration and praise had been given before the interaction of the two took place which showed respect and appreciation for their partner, but this second poem only goes up as far as to verbal seduction and the aftermath of it was never seen and so the consequences (if there were any) could not have been seen by the reader. ...read more.

Middle

He breathes out a little because he's finally been asked. There's probably a grin on his face, this only shows total immaturity of Peter's characters, just right for the age he may be depicting, young, crude, not knowing much of the world yet. He slowly draws his breath so as he can collect his thought because he's not completely sure of what he's going to say. "Like a drum roll preceding the wire act". I think this suggests that this person is nervous, the writer uses simile "wire act" and anyone who does anything at altitude have rights to be scared and anxious. The writer is introducing more of this character's arrogance, "And he smiles a lazy smile And ... Stage whispers, "First time y' know: hers, not mine of course." This 'male-macho' attitude is old and beginning to get unbearable. It is not as if he is telling the truth, maybe he is but he's giving his friends a bad impression about the girl, mocking her innocence and inexperience. "And his audience lean back appreciatively" the writer shows not disgust from the gang but toleration of this attitude towards women, treating them like trash. The poem has a quick, short but dramatic and meaningful ending. While the girl is scorned, the gang are transfixed with the story and are envious because it wasn't them in his position. ...read more.

Conclusion

If you notice the apostrophe in amorous, this is a form of writing adapted by great romantic writers of the time. "And tear our pleasures with rough strife Thorough the iron gates of life. Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we can make him run" I think this means that they cannot stop time: that they cannot stay young forever and waste it on unconditional adoration. 'Giving it a run /run for its money' meaning that they will endeavour to do it with the best of their abilities, and take it to it's full potential. (a little confusing but at least this poem ends on a high note) Both poems are fantastic; they have different styles of writing but still show us an image they were trying to portray with their words. I think both writers are trying to make us aware that we should respect our partners and that we have no control over time. No control meaning we cannot turn it back when we do something we regret, and that we don't have enough of it. I think the message is to use the time we have wisely and not let the pressure of anticipation get to us. Everything will come in the right time, so we shouldn't hurry it but when it does to take it to the full. 1 ...read more.

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