• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Comparsion of ‘At Castle Boterel' ByThomas Hardy and ‘Piano’ By D.H Lawrence.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A COMPARSION OF 'AT CASTLE BOTEREL BY THOMAS HARDY AND 'PIANO' BY D.H LAWRENCE The idea portrayed by 'At Castle Boterel' is very much to do with the speaker's memory of a love he once shared with a girl, or possibly his wife. The scene of the poem is set very casually, using simple language. This language, however, has many ways in which it can be interpreted. The speaker has reached a 'junction of lane and highway', with a junction being a point of choice. The speaker may have to choice of which way to drive but also the choice of which direction to take in his life; he could return to the past or go to the future. Hardy uses pathetic fallacy in order to convey different atmospheres. ...read more.

Middle

It becomes clear that the happy moments of the poem represent the speaker reminiscing of his love and what used to be. The first two stanzas involve the use of enjambment allow for the last sentence of the first stanza to continue into the first sentence of the second one. Not only does enjambment do this, but it also provides a connection between the speaker's present and past lives; a sense of transition between the two. The speaker's memories of his experience come across as vague due to Hardy's continuous use of short sentences, which are vague and mundane. This vagueness continues into the third paragraph when the speaker doesn't inform the reader about what 'matters not much' or about 'to what it led'. ...read more.

Conclusion

This indicates that the speaker has crystallised this moment in his mind as 'a time of [such] quality'. The mountain the speaker and his love climbed is 'foot-swift [and] foot-sore' and this compound epiphyte suggests that many couples have climbed the mountain before them. the 'primaeval rocks [that] form the road's steep border', as well as the speaker are the only two who can remember this day. The rocks are primaeval; that have been there since the beginning of time and will continue to be there for millions of years to come. They have witnessed this moment and preserved it along with many other moments, however they have not changed throughout time. People, on the other hand, especially the speaker do change. They experience new ages and lives and can only hold onto certain experiences as a memory. This is what the speaker is doing with her memory of his love. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Thomas Hardy section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Thomas Hardy essays

  1. Comparison of "Tony Kytes, the arch deceiver" by Thomas Hardy and "Tickets please" by ...

    In "Tickets Please", the relationships are supposed to be short term, they lack commitment from both sides, and are not about supporting the female partner financially, as the women in "Tickets please" work, and so are financially independent. The relationships that occur on the tram service are generally short term, sexual relationships.

  2. A Comparison between the Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy and Odour of Chrysanthemums by ...

    Gertrude and Farmer Lodge both die also. D.H. Lawrence wrote "Odour of Chrysanthemums" which is about a lonely woman named Elizabeth Bates. In this story Elisabeth feels trapped in her marriage as her husband, Walter Bates is always out either working down the mines or drinking whilst she is left looking after their two young children.

  1. Compare the ways in which Thomas Hardy and Charlotte Perkins Gilman capture and maintain ...

    The story ends when Mr Marroner finds out what had happened and looks for Gerta and Mrs Marroner, but when he finds them, living in a separate house on their own, all Mrs Marroner says is " What have you to say to us?"

  2. 'At Castle Boterel' and the short story 'The Melancholy Hussar of the German Legion' ...

    When Phyllis meets Matth�us, it is then summer again. This is used to great effect and the mirroring of nature with the events of human life works well. Hardy also implies that single moments are taken away by time's unflinching rigour but writing and memories defy time as they cannot be erased and mean that even a short-lived relationship

  1. Compare and contrast the ways in which Hardy explores 'Time's unflinching rigour' in 'At ...

    This, in my opinion, creates an awkward read, as time throughout the story is not spread out equally. This is done in an attempt to defeat 'Time's unflinching rigour'. We are made aware that Hardy misses sections of time because Phyllis recalls some events more than others, because some events are more important to her than others.

  2. Compare and Contrast “Piano” and “At Castle Boterel”

    (Stanza 5) Hardy says that the primeval rocks that have been there for millions of years and would be there for millions of years to come, recorded that he and Emma passed by. Only the rocks and he would remember because he can't go back to that very time so he has to have a memory.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work