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A day in school life

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A day in school life The day begins with a high-pitched yell, "moooooooorninnnnng" from my mother. I wake up tired with a headache as I think I have a cold. I rush to leave the house, my father complains about the lack of urgency in my movement by shouting out the time every five minutes. There is not enough time to drink my tea; the tea burns my tongue as I gulp it down my throat, leaving a nasty taste. I ran as fast as I can towards my bus stop. Upon arriving I realize that despite the hectic hurry of mornings I am actually early. "I really should tell my parents what time the bus comes so my mornings can be more relaxed," I tell myself. The large coach's doors slide open to a small flight of stairs, which give way to the seats, the people on it are all staring out of the window. Everybody seems somber and detached. However, when I go to sit next to my friend, he hesitates about removing his bag from the seat I want to sit on. ...read more.


My mood is lifted as I make quite a few people laugh. The first lesson is French. The teacher is absent so I am free to take part in a conversation with my friend concerning the weekend. The teacher next door keeps telling us to keep quiet. For some reason the rest of my fellow students feel the need to shout and keep getting louder after each complaint. The second period begins. The teacher ignores my enquiries as to whether we will be using the "metro " book this lesson then yells at me for not having written the title in my book, even though she hasn't started the lesson or even written the title on the board. When I point this out to the teacher another student already distracts her. After twenty minutes, the tiredness sets in and hinders my work effort. The headache from that morning begins to throb and my eyes are itchy and bloodshot. The mountain scenery contrasts against the blockish and uninspiring appearance of the school, as it leaves a light and breezy atmosphere. ...read more.


However, there is one exception. One of the dinner ladies is rotten to the core and in the past she has refused to serve me pudding. The meals are tasty enough and although the food can sometimes appear unappetizing, squishy little lumps up fish or pasta rolls with brown filling, the food served is sufficient. The diner ladies sometimes serve extra chips or whatever being served with their bare hands, they come up to a table and toss the chips on your plate after coughing into their hands. "Two more lessons to go," I tell myself, and thankfully I have maths with Mr. Allman next whose personality makes the lesson seem pleasant enough. I am dreading my last lesson, science, because although I enjoy the subject I am too tired. However, in science I hear that I have been given an A grade for my coursework. I am encouraged by this mark and I become more receptive and learn quite a lot. The day ends and I wait for my bus by playing a little basketball and talking a bit. When the bus arrives I sit next to a friend but we don't talk, as there is nothing to talk about. ...read more.

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