• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Doll House by Ibsen and The Metamorphosis by Kakfa,

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

WORLD LITERATURE PAPER I Name: Matthew Stanelle Student Number: _____________________________ Date: December 5, 2002 Name of Junior Year English Teacher: Mr. Hajewski Word Count: 1475 Title: Nora and the Samsa Family - Better Off Without Torvald and Gregor Nature of Study: In the Beginning of Both A Doll House by Ibsen and The Metamorphosis by Kakfa, Nora and the Samsa family seem to be overwhelmingly dependent of Torvald and Gregor. However, they both continuously change throughout the play and the novel. And my intent is to examine this change and come to the conclusion that both are better off without the support and guidance they've been given. Strategy Employed: Formal Essay Although Kafka portrays the Samsa family as dependents of Gregor in the beginning of Metamorphosis, and Ibsen also portrays Nora as a wife who depends on the support and guidance of her husband in A Doll House, both the Samsa family and Nora prove they can be independent and happy without him and her husband. In Act One of A Doll House a conversation between Mrs. Linde and Nora reveals that Nora has secretly borrowed money to finance a trip to Italy to save the life of her husband, Torvald Helmer, which she hopes to repay without consequence. ...read more.

Middle

Once Helene delivers the second letter from Krogstad, Torvald tried to dismiss everything he just said. Unfortunately, it was too late. "Helmer: May I write you? Nora: No-never. You're not to do that. Helmer: Oh, but let me send you - Nora: Nothing. Nothing. Helmer: Or help you if you need it. Nora: No. I accept nothing from strangers." (114) As you can see, Nora wants nothing to do with Torvald. She's lived in a manner suitable only for Torvald. She worked hard for him around the house and to pay off the debt that saved his life. Everything she did revolved around Torvald. However, she found the courage within her to break free from this emotional imprisonment that Torvald provided for her. She was unappreciated and her potential was unfulfilled. She is better off without him. In comparison, Kafka introduces Gregor in Metamorphosis as the breadwinner of the Samsa family, just as Torvald was. Much like Nora, his family contributes to the household responsibilities, but counts on Gregor for his support and guidance. However, once Gregor awakes as a giant bug and is incapable of guiding and supporting them, the family is forced to take responsibility for themselves and Gregor. ...read more.

Conclusion

Kafka makes it appear this is the best thing that could have happened and the family can now be happy. The trolley car they took was "completely filled with warm sunshine" (58). Sunshine represents a good feeling; a feeling of happiness. And although one's family would tend to grieve after the lost of a family member, they appear to be happy and independent without him as they lean "back comfortably in their seats" (58). The family takes time on the Trolley to look at their prospects for the future and they "weren't all that bad" (58). Obviously, they've proven they don't need Gregor. In fact, they "would now take a smaller and cheaper apartment, but one better situated and in every way simpler to manage than the old one, which Gregor had picked for them" (58). Therefore, not only are they happier without him, they're also better off! The change Nora and the Samsa family underwent is clear. Both Nora and the family were dependent on support and guidance. However, they all had potential to succeed on their own. Nora was driven to the point where she wanted absolutely nothing to do with her husband. And the Samsa family was forced to deal with Gregor as a bug, but can live happy now that he's gone. CANDIDATE NUMBER: _________________________ WORD COUNT: 1475 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Henrik Ibsen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Henrik Ibsen essays

  1. How does the role of women show the societal beliefs of the time period ...

    "Helmer: Hasn't she paid a visit to the confectioner's?" (Act 1, Ibsen) In this dialogue Torvald is suggesting that Nora isn't even allowed to make the decision to go to the sweet shop by herself. This would show an audience that Torvald controls every accept of her life, Nora has sacrificed everything for Torvald.

  2. A Doll's House Externalizing Inner Problems

    Rank: What, with death just around the corner? And when it's to pay for someone else's sins! Where's the justice in that? Yet in one way or another there isn't a single family where some sort of inexorable retribution isn't being exacted.

  1. A Doll House Essay

    Mills stated that people naturalized things to make them feel better, knowing it is unjust, including issues of slavery.

  2. "Do you want your characters to live? See to it that they are free." ...

    Hedda suffers the indignity of a boring husband, "the whole of that case was crammed full of nothing but notes", an overbearing in-law, "Well, of course I had to come and see how you've settled in", a vibrant former associate who draws attention to the freedom she craves, "it must be beautiful", and a sexually predatory neighbour, "Dearest Hedda...

  1. Henrik Ibsen - A Doll's House - Plot.

    to what extent are we ready to give to protect the ones we love, the difference between sexes (women seemingly being less selfish), also at sacrifice as a proof for emotions. Also, the play focuses on often very relative differences between sacrifice and duty.

  2. Reviewing a live performance - Henrik Ibsen's : A Doll's House.

    Torvald Helmet, valuing his honour over his love for his wife Nora, galvanizes her to figuratively abandon her doll house - replete with her husband, 2 children, & 2 servants. She, in striking out on her own, concurrently abandons the rigid social class system of the time, as well as the unwritten rules and mores of society.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work