• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Dolls House- Act 1 and Act 2

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A Doll’s House- Act 1 and Act 2 1. In the play, “Doll’s House” by Henrik Ibsen, portrays the protagonist, Nora as a very child-like character who understands a man’s world better than she will let on. She is treated very similarly to a doll; she is played with and treated like a child. Her husband Torvald Helmer does not believe that Nora understands the world of money and business. Nora doesn’t let on that she does, and she plays along to this façade of being someone with no knowledge on the outside world. It is evident that she is aware of the world of business when she says “” In business, you know things called quarterly payment and …. I couldn’t save much out of the housekeeping money” (Ibsen, 161). From this quote, it is evident that Nora is very much aware of the borrowing system in the business world. She understands the system of borrowing money, and paying it back in quarterly payments. By her knowing this information, it is clear that Nora is not just the puppet of Torvald, but an intelligent woman who is informed of the world’s events. Furthermore, Nora proves that she knows about the world of men by saying, “Last winter I was lucky enough to get a lot of copying to do, so I locked myself in and st writing-often till after midnight. ...read more.

Middle

Nora suggests that they can borrow money, and when Torvald warned that the people they borrowed from will come looking for them, Nora said ? Them? Who bothers about them? They?re just strangers? (Ibsen, 149). In reply to this, Torvald had said, ?Nora, Nora! Just like a woman? (Ibsen, 149)! This demonstrates Nora?s acting skills as a typical woman. She doesn?t let on that she is aware of the matters in a man?s world. She explains the importance of her playing this role of the innocent, helpless wife when she tells Kristina, ?Besides, Torvald has his pride-most men have- he?d be terribly hurt and humiliated if he thought he owed anything to me. It?d spoil everything between us, and our lovely happy home would never be the same again? (Ibsen, 161). From this, it is evident that Nora only puts up with this act just to please her husband. She does not show her true, intelligent colours to her husband, but acts as the damsel in distress wife that he wishes her to be. In conclusion, Nora merely pretends to be a doll-like character in front of her husband. In reality, she is a very intelligent, well-informed woman who has a lot of knowledge on the business world, but never shows that she does to her husband. ...read more.

Conclusion

I must just tell you one thing, though. Do you know we?ve just had the most wonderful stroke of luck- only the other day? (Ibsen, 155). In this, Nora first says that she will listen to Mrs. Linde, but then she ignores that and carries on with her life story. Nora was too excited and happy that she just told Mrs. Linde about the new bank manager post, being inconsiderate to her feelings. She was being too hyper and peppy that she could no longer hold that piece of information within herself. This further demonstrates Nora?s childlikeness. Since Nora receives everything she desires, and is treated similar to a pet, she acts very childlike for a grown woman. Compared to Mrs. Linde, Nora has not faced many tragedies. Nora did have to save her husband?s life, yet she is so subtle about it. She does not use this as an advantage and become arrogant like Mrs. Linde. Instead, she hides the fact that she too has worked hard for someone else, and pretends to be childish instead. Mrs. Linde has openly faced many challenges, and overcome them, which made her haughty. On the other hand, Nora is seen to have not faced many problems; however she has secretly overcome many challenges. She hides this and acts childish, proving that she is humble. In summary, it can be said that the different experiences of the world one has, shapes the personality of oneself. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Henrik Ibsen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Henrik Ibsen essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The Importance of Scenography in Miss Julie and A Doll's House

    4 star(s)

    Help me, now! Order me, and I'll obey like a dog! Do me this last service, save my honor, save his name!..."1 It is evident from the manner of speech and the broken phrases that Julie finds herself on the brim of hysteria and effectively, lacks the power to commit suicide.

  2. The plays 'Miss Julie', August Strindberg, 1888 and 'A Doll's House', Henrik Ibsen, 1879 ...

    This clearly stated the inferiority she ended the play in relation to Jean. Strindberg wants to show the humiliation passed by Julie, to show the need that Julie had for that man in the end. He wanted to emphasize the idea of class and gender conflict happening in the play.

  1. Plot and Sub-Plot of A Doll's House

    As the play progresses Mrs. Linde acts as confidante to Nora, but then rekindles her old flame with Krogstad and after trying to persuade Nora to tell Torvald of the secret, she convinces Krogstad, who nearly gives up, to tell Torvald, saying that for Nora and Torvald to have a proper relationship 'then must have a full understanding.'

  2. Two Men Destroyed by a Secret: A Comparative Study of Oedipus the King and ...

    The revelation of these secrets causes both these men to act in a way, which directly or indirectly causes destructive changes in their lives. Torvald upon learning of Nora's loan, proceeds to blame and berate her for foolishness. This scolding causes Nora's epiphany.

  1. How does the role of women show the societal beliefs of the time period ...

    She sorts out a bank loan and signs her father's name; theses are both tasks that the man would have taken care of. In the first Act Torvald is teasing Nora about the work she carried out last Christmas, however Nora simply replies "I didn't find it dull."

  2. In what ways is 'A Doll's House' a suitable title for the play?

    just as Nora's speech also relates to how a child would speak. 'One day I might, yes. Many years from now, when I've lost my looks a little. Don't laugh. I mean, of course, a time will come when Torvald is not as devoted to me, not quite so happy

  1. The portrayal of women as rebels in society, as seen by the characterisation of ...

    as Torvald, with reference to Krogstad and his act of forging a signature, says to Nora that "because an atmosphere of lies like that infects and poisons the whole life of a home. In a house like that, every breath that the children take is filled with the germs of

  2. A Doll's House Externalizing Inner Problems

    Linde go on a holiday to relax after having worked for three years. "Mrs Linde [going over to the window]: I haven't a father to pay my fare, Nora"; this illustrates her jealousy and scorn at Nora, who supposedly had a father to finance her honeymoon trip to Italy.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work