• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Going away and returning by Raymond Wilson and First visit to the seaside by Phoebe Hesketh share as a central theme a day trip to the seaside.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'Going away and returning' and 'First visit to the Seaside' 'Going away and returning' by Raymond Wilson and 'First visit to the seaside' by Phoebe Hesketh share as a central theme a day trip to the seaside. They create vivid images and recollections as we remember our own visits to the sea, but are used within the poems in different ways. The title 'First visit to the Seaside' immediately tells you what the poem will be about. The fact that it is the 'first visit' of the author to the seaside shows that the poet is recounting childhood memories, and as such the poem takes on a child-like quality in its portrayal of the innocent beauty of the first visit to the sea. This contrasts with the far more cryptic title 'Going away and returning', which is a far more forbidding, less cheerful hint at a theme of travel. ...read more.

Middle

This helps draw the reader into the poem, experiencing everything as Wilson did, all the sights and sounds. The sense of wonder conveyed by the sights and sounds reflects a feeling of vibrancy about the bay and town, which are in all probability a stark contrast to his usual habitation, perhaps a 'slum street' as alluded to - 'sand-dunes where slum streets...should be'. 'Going away and returning' however, shows rather less positivity in its assessment of what can be an amazing experience. The colours are limited to 'white' and 'grey'. Waves are 'slopping', a listless sound which one could almost imagine as being onomatopoeic. In contrast to 'First visit to the seaside', explored through the eyes of a child, 'Going away and returning' has a distinctly adult tone; no child is cynical or world-weary enough to write a somewhat depressing and hard-edged poem on a seaside visit! ...read more.

Conclusion

The line suggests their futility, and is a metaphor for Hesketh's view of the people: how pointless their lives and activities are, equally as futile as a sandcastle, and will be washed away... this mood and idea is reinforced by the final passage of the poem, in which a return home is shown. The day away has changed nothing; the 'letter unanswered on the fridge' is still there, the 'dead flowers' are in the 'same vase'. A contrast to the end of 'First visit to the Seaside', where even leaving is comparatively happy. The final image is of lights on both the prom and pier glowing 'dimly' in the night, as they recede into the distance, with stars 'winking' and 'glimmering', a final piece of magic as the day draws to a close. While I enjoyed both poems, I much preferred the vibrant, cheerful and vivid impression Wilson creates of his first visit to the seaside. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparisons section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Comparisons essays

  1. "Manwatching" by Georgia Garrett and "First Ice" by Andrei Voznesensky

    In "First ice" the atmosphere is cold and lonely. The cold is shown through the repetition of words that represent cold such as " freezes" "ice and "icy". The line "she'll have to go home alone, alone" represents the lonely feeling an the repetition of alone just emphasises this feeling.

  2. Compare and contrast The Flea(TM) by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress(TM) by ...

    would have obviously missed her chance with him, and because she wouldn't let him take her virginity, the worms she will be buried with will. Him saying this could confuse the women because no women wants to think about that happening to her, so maybe she will begin to think

  1. In Passing By Arthur Yap - What is your impression of the visitor ...

    They even took the effort to bring him to "the seaside restaurant" and "feted" him on the "speciality of chili-crabs and fried noodles". "Feted" suggests that the hosts arranged an elaborate feast for the visitor, proving them to be very generous.

  2. miracle on st davids day

    Clarke uses poetic devices to create an image of the man. " A big, mild man is tenderly led." . This use of contrasting language informs the reader that even though the man is large in size he has to be tenderly led like a child, continuing to imply to the reader that there is something wrong with him.

  1. Compare and contrast On Judgement Day by Sipho Sepamla and Telephone Conversation by Wole ...

    should be, so therefore racial stereotypes, this is shown very much in the first stanza and is a recurring theme that is brought up all through the poem. An example of this, from stanza 1 is the line 'black people are born singers, black people are born runners, black people

  2. Poetry of the first world War

    It is also extremely auditory and the use of sound is evident throughout, the reader can hear the girl who, 'calls for orders at your door' and 'who cries 'all fares, please'. These woman gained empowerment and liberty, hence the line, 'no longer caged and penned up'.

  1. How does Wilfred Owen in Disabled treat the subject of exclusion? Including comparisons with ...

    The first three lines, starting with ?Now, he will spend a few sick years in institutes,? it is the narrator who is describing what will happen to him in the future and as life goes on. This is epitomised in the fourth and fifth lines ?Tonight he noticed how the

  2. Comparison of 'Out of the Blue' and 'Futility'

    the man compares a normal day where he is awoken by the Sun to this day where everything has drastically changed. Both poets have selected emotional vocabulary to emphasise their points and add to particular atmospheres. The vocabulary used in both is powerful and important however both imply different aspects.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work