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A Life Story of Thomas Owens

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A Life Story of Thomas Owens Chapter 1: 0 - Two and a half years My father rushed in to the hospital and came in to my mothers ward saying that he had had an awful day at work and immediately started eating sandwiches (my mother was not allowed to eat for 24 hours after the operation!) My mother had to have a caesarean to allow me to be born alive (or at all) because the umbilical cord was conveniently wrapped around my neck and so I would have been strangled to death. But fortunately, to the benefit of the world, I was born! When my mother came round from the the General Anaesthetic after I was born, the nurse came in to my mothers room and said, "Congratulations Mrs Owens, you have a beautiful baby boy!" However beautiful I was, my mother, at that time, did not really seem to think so, and so elegantly said, "I really could not care if he looks like a Christmas tree!" This was evidently because she was undergoing a lot of pain. I was born on June 29th, 1987, at ten minutes to midnight. I weighed eight pounds seven ounces. When my mother had recovered and when the Owens family had got back to normal again, my mother was finding it extremely hard to cope. My father, being 55 years old at the time, and of course just a mere man, did literally nothing to help my poor mother. The nurse came over to our house regularly because whenever I did anything other than sit bolt upright on the floor, in my mothers eyes, I was ill. But generally there was nothing wrong with me. And yes, just like any other baby I had to be fed, and this meant that my mother had to get up every four hours in the night, and find time in the day to feed me. ...read more.


She was very worried that I would not like the school, but she was very wrong. I ambled out of Arnold House with a huge grin on my face, and before my mother could ask me how my day had been, I immediately blurted out," We had roast chicken and roast potatoes for lunch!" My mother heaved a sigh of relief at this statement and knew that I had enjoyed my first day at school. For the next two years I remained in the junior school until I was seven years old. I was still learning some basic skills and how to improve upon them. Life was generally the same for these two years. At the age of six I had made some very good friends among the junior school, with the help of my mother, who was naturally gifted in these matters. At Arnold House we learnt all the core subjects as one does now, and also Art. The lessons got longer and progressively harder as one moved up the school. On the whole, I coped very well. Unfortunately, since Arnold House was a day school in London, the facilities were rather poor. There was a small yard, to kick a football around in break and that was all. As for sports, we travelled in a coach to Canons Park, where we played our various games. Games occurred every other day because the journey was reasonably long, and there was not enough room for the whole school to play at once. Matches were held every Saturday against other London schools. Apart from playing Football, Rugby and Cricket the school went swimming once a week in the morning, missing first lesson. Extra curriculum activities were optional and were held after school on any day of the week. These included Judo, Short Tennis, Drama and Badminton. Each taking place on different days. I could have stayed at Arnold House until I was thirteen. ...read more.


The day came when we were to be told our results. The waiting was torture, but the news was good! I rang up my parents and said, " Unfortunately...you are going to have to pay the school fees for Radley!" My parents were overwhelmed with joy to here such good news. It was a huge relief of my chest. From then on, it was all fun and games, until next September, when I would be starting public school, Radley. Chapter 5: Thirteen - Fourteen years old The summer holidays before I went to Radley, was one of the best of my life. I did not pick up a pen, or use my brain in any excessive way what so ever. Life was bliss, and I was enjoying it. I was also excited and nervous about starting Radley. On my first day at Radley, I realised how different it was to Summer Fields. Instead of being a big person in a little school, I became a very small boy in a very big school. Also, in your first year at Radley, you are given more responsibilities and people expect a lot of you. I thought that I was going to find it hard to make friends, but being in 'A' Social with Mr Wesson and a really nice group of boys, nothing could go wrong. I made many friends and am really enjoying life at Radley. The work is hard but it is worth it just to be here. I am now in my second term at Radley and life is still great, especially as I have no major exams in the near future. I am very glad and lucky to be able to come to this school. What ever is going to happen next in my life, I do not know. But what I do know is that I have a lot of people to thank, especially my parents, for bringing to this stage so far. I am very grateful to them and all that they have done. So here is my life in a Nut Shell. Thomas Owens Shell 2 ...read more.

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