• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

He is Shakespeares ideal man: a man of action, Christian, brave and a highly successful leader. Do you agree with this assessment?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"He is Shakespeare's ideal man: a man of action, Christian, brave and a highly successful leader." Do you agree with this assessment? In Henry V it emerges that to be a good king does not necessarily mean being an ideal man. An example of this is the claim to the throne by the divine right of kings "Derived from Edward, his great grandfather." This quote suggests that Henry was supposed to be king and justifies him going to war with France. In addition he calls upon God through the "divine right of kings", throughout the play which suggests that God wants Henry to be king. On the other hand it appears that he has no loyalty to his previous friends as he contributes to the death of Bardolph and Sir John Falstaff. Moreover Henry has reformed like "The strawberry grows underneath the nettle/ and wholesome berries thrive and ripen best/ neighboured by fruit of baser quality." Henry is now a wise and sober king and concealed this when he was young but transpired to be an excellent king. Henry is a Christian king and calls upon god on numerous occasions during the play. An example of this is when he does not want to fight because of the sickness amongst his men, but if the French confront him he will not avoid it. ...read more.

Middle

This shows Henry has got divine grace and has changed from a drunk to a civilise man. Furthermore "Under the veil of wildness" shows that he has always been clever and capable, it was just hidden, intellect maturity. He has the ability, perhaps a fa´┐Żade "grew like the summer grass, fastest by night." This statement shows that although on the outside it looks as if he is a drunk who hangs around with the low lives, but at night when everyone was asleep and could not see him he grew in knowledge, maturity and understanding. There are points in the play where it is not certain that Henry has fully matured like when the Bishops Ely and Canterbury are talking to Henry about the passing of the new law and how they support the war financially, it begs the question has Henry changed or is he still open to corruption. There is plenty of evidence throughout to prove that Henry has reformed like when Montjoy is seeking permission to recover the dead. He refers to Henry as a "great king" twice in his speech. "By a vain, giddy, shallow, humorous youth," this statement contrasts with "The strawberry grows underneath the nettle/ and wholesome berries thrive and ripen best/ neighboured by fruit of baser quality." ...read more.

Conclusion

In the battle scenes he is very brave and makes sure that he keeps the morale up around the camp. He is also fair as he says that they can take the French villages, but cannot steal from them. When Bardolph, his previous friend, steals from the church he is disloyal to him and treats him as he would to any soldier. He says "nothing taken but paid for" and later Bardolph is hanged for stealing and Henry warns of how this be a lesson for anyone else wanting to steal of the French. In conclusion, Henry V is Shakespeare's ideal man to a certain extent as he is a man of action, he is a good Christian, he is brave and a highly successful leader. There is much contextual knowledge to prove this as throughout the play the audience sees him demonstrate many of these qualities in different situations and to different effect. On the other hand though he is seen at times to be disloyal to his previous friends and although he has changed mainly for the better the way he treats the people who used to be good friends with him is unacceptable and shows that he is not completely perfect but does come close to perfect in the way that Shakespeare portrays him. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Miscellaneous section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Miscellaneous essays

  1. Shakespeare Coursework - Henry

    His maturity and intelligence is again shown when discussing an invasion of France, Henry remembers that the Scots also need to be held back. Henry is constantly trying to prove himself, but he also knows that he has to establish himself as a leader that his people can look up to and admire as their king.

  2. A FRACTURE IN FICTION

    Facts: -Taught Spanish to seventh graders Akerman school in Hampton Falls -Credited wife Blythe as his therapist in liner notes of CD, "Angels and Demons" Citation: (2004). Meet Dan: Biography. Retrieved April 13, 2007, from The Offical Website of Dan Brown Web site: http://www.danbrown.com/meet_dan/index.html Citation: (2006).

  1. Hemingway's The Old Man and The Sea - complete set of notes, page by ...

    Given this optimistic spirit he thinks of his physical discomfort as 'almost comfortable'. The old man asks for the boy many times. He realises that the boy is of great practical assistance, as well as having talismanic significance. The old man knows that the boy, though small and young, would give him moral support and sustain him in his endeavour.

  2. Indian Camp

    Nick didn't look at it. "Now," his father said, "there's some stitches to put in. You can watch this or not, Nick, just as you like. I'm going to sew up the incision I made." Nick did not watch. His curiosity had been gone for a long time.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work