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"A streetcar named Desire" written by Tennessee Williams.

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Introduction

"A streetcar named Desire" written by Tennessee Williams. It was set at Elysian Fields, a district of New Orleans. This play was published in November 1947. In this exceptional story the readers are introduced to the main character named Blanche DuBois. This hypercritical women with dishonest manners moves to New Orleans intending to move in with her younger sister Stella Kowalski and her husband Stanley. In Scene 1, Blanche DuBois arrives from Belle Reve (claiming to have lost their mansion) to New Orleans, where her younger sister Stella is living with her husband Stanley who are living in a small apartment. She comes intending to stay with Stella without giving Stella notice of her arrival. ...read more.

Middle

"I'm talking of legal papers. Connected with the plantation". Stanley thinks that Blanche has obscured all of the wealth. Later on during the play Blanche comes across one of Stanley's good friends, Mitch, whom she starts to like. Blanche really wants to get together with Mitch as she knows he would be able to get rid of all her problems (insecurity). She has also tried to flirt with him and to get a few answers out of him; Blanche found out that he owns a house, in which he is currently living in with his sick elderly mother. Stella notices something going on and asks her sister if she needs Mitch, she replies by saying "Yes-I want Mitch...very badly! ...read more.

Conclusion

In scene 7, Stanley finds out some forgotten truth about Blanche and her previous teaching career. Blanche had a habit of dealing with men of all ages especially men that are younger than her. Blanche was thrown out of her teaching career as she got mixed up with a youth of seventeen years of age. "They kicked her out of that high school before the spring term ended and I hate to tell you the reason that step was taken! A seventeen-year-old-boy-she'd gotten mixed up with!" All is lost for Blanche when Stanley informs Mitch of her past life as a prostitute Shuail Jusab Page 1 of 2 ...read more.

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  1. How does Tennessee Williams dramatise the tension between reality and fantasy in 'A Streetcar ...

    A policeman's whistle breaks it up. The figures disappear.' (p.79) Just a little while later there will be a struggle similar between Blanche and Stanley, only there is no policeman to break it up. Williams uses the names of the places in ''A Streetcar Named Desire' to show the contrast between reality and fantasy.

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    The distant piano goes into a hectic breakdown. This is a dramatic moment for Blanche. According to this quote, Stella is lying and hiding her true emotions. Blanche is fearful, Stella is deceitful, and the piano breaks down. It symbolises the shock, fright and the fact that the truth has finally been disclosed.

  2. How successfully has Williams introduced the main characters and ideas of A Streetcar named ...

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  1. The Analysis of Blanche Dubois in A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams

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    Scene Three underscores the primal nature of Stella and Stanley's union, and it cements Stanley's identity as a villain. After Stanley's drunken radio-hurling episode, Stella yells at him and calls him an "animal thing," inciting Stanley's attack. Later that night, Stanley shouts "STELL-LAHHHHH!"

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