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A View from a Bridge

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Introduction

Literature Coursework: A View from the Bridge Q. How does Arthur Miller use characters and structures of his play to maintain tension and interest? Arthur Miller is credited for producing one of the best plays known to writers. His parents were immigrants to America in search of work, wealth and security. Up into the Wall Street Crash his family was quite rich but afterwards he had to work to save up before heading to Michigan University; studying Economics and History. A View from the Bridge came to existence when it was first produced as a one-act play in verse in 1955, the revised and extended two-act play followed in 1956 presented at Comedy Theatre in London. The inspiration from a View from the Bridge the act was from a friend lawyer who mentioned that a longshoreman ratted on his two brothers to break an engagement with one of them and his niece, as they were living illegally in his home. After a couple of years when Arthur Miller visited Italy, he noticed that a dozen men stood around a well all day in the vain hope of a local estate needing an extra worker; this story also attached itself to the one earlier, in result Arthur Miller put these two aspects in life together so he could form the play 'A View from the Bridge'. The structure of the play culminates in the first act and then releases all the tension in the second act. ...read more.

Middle

He quickly becomes jealous of Rodolfo as he notices an immediate impression that Rodolfo made on Catherine, the book states 'He looks at Catherine like a lost boy'. The tension mounts when Catherine tells Rodolfo that she loves him, these words made an immediate impact on the shameful emotion hidden in Eddie's feelings. Also whenever Beatrice or Alfieri mention about the implicit feelings he has for Catherine, he quickly angers and tries to disguise it saying he is the one who looked after her. In addition to this, when Eddie eventually becomes obsessive, he tries everything to prevent Rodolfo from marrying her such as when he attempts to discredit him by insulting his abilities as feminine: cook, sing, and sew. He then claims that Rodolfo is homo-sexual and constantly tells Catherine that he is only after her to gain his citizenship. Continuing his attempt to discredit him, he tries to involve the law but finds that there is nothing the law or Alfieri can do to help him other than the fact that Rodolfo and Marco are illegal immigrants. Furthermore he makes excuses. For instance hitting Rodolfo and acting as though he was teaching him how to box. He did this in order to hit him. This causes Marco to act as he sees his little brother bullied, he has a test of strength with Eddie by lifting a chair in a position he was able to achieve whilst Eddie couldn't. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion I believe that all the tension, problems and drama revolve around Eddie, he is the focal point, every thing that Eddie says or does rests on his reactions to the event. At the start this is a minor: will he or won't he allow Catherine to take a job? Then it becomes more crucial: will he or won't he understand that he cannot keep Catherine to himself, which he must consider her to live her own life, not rely on him? Eddie is what the play focuses on-his conflict, both within him and with other characters. At one point or another he has an argument with all the characters and starts them e.g. "I betcha there's plenty of surprises sometimes when those guys get back there, heh?" even his jokes are bitter and harsh. He has conflict within himself emotionally whether to let go of Catherine or force her to stay, pretending she is still the child he was entrusted with. He has physical conflict, first with Rodolfo then Marco, with tragic results. Each conflict creates a tension that once culminates was unleashed on Eddie all the problems that faced him intensified the more he ignored it eventually causing his own death. Therefore I strongly believe that Eddie was most of all to blame for his own death as it was he who built all the conflict and tension between the people he cared for. Subject: English Ibrahim Hassan-Adde (11T2) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mr. Perrot A View from the Bridge Page 1 ...read more.

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